Medical Cannabis Use in Glioma Patients Treated at a Comprehensive Cancer Center in Florida.

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“Glioma is a devastating primary tumor of the central nervous system with difficult-to-manage symptoms.

Cannabis products have been postulated to potentially benefit glioma patients. Recent state legalization allowed investigators an opportunity to study glioma patients’ adoption of medical marijuana (MM).

Objective: Our goals were to: (1) determine the prevalence of marijuana use, both through physician recommendation and self-medication, and (2) evaluate its perceived risks and benefits in glioma patients.

Results: A total of 73 patients were surveyed. The majority of participants were aware that MM was legal in the state, and most reported learning of this through the media. Over 70% of participants reported having considered using MM, and a third reported using marijuana products after their diagnosis. Most received recommendations from friends/family rather than a medical provider, and only half of the users had obtained a physician’s recommendation. Users generally reported benefits.

Conclusions: With the increasing national conversation that accompanies legalization, glioma patients are pursuing marijuana for the treatment for their symptoms. More research and education is needed to bring health care providers into the conversation.”

“A glioma is a primary brain tumor that originates from the supportive cells of the brain, called glial cells.” http://neurosurgery.ucla.edu/body.cfm?id=159
“Remarkably, cannabinoids kill glioma cells selectively and can protect non-transformed glial cells from death.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15275820
“A meta-analysis of 34 in vitro and in vivo studies of cannabinoids in glioma reported that all but one study confirmed that cannabinoids selectively kill tumor cells.”  https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/hp/cannabis-pdq#section/_7
“Since cannabinoids kill tumor cells without toxicity on their non transformed counterparts, they can represent a class of new potential anticancer drugs.”                                        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3835116/ 
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