Exploration of Potentially Bioactive Peptides Generated from the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Hempseed Proteins.

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

“The seed of industrial hemp is an underexploited protein source. In view of a possible use in functional foods, a hempseed protein concentrate was hydrolyzed with pepsin, trypsin, pancreatin, or a mixture of these enzymes. A detailed peptidomic analysis using data-dependent acquisition showed that the numbers of peptides identified ranged from 90 belonging to 33 parent proteins in the peptic hydrolysate to 9 belonging to 6 proteins in the pancreatin digest. The peptic and tryptic hydrolysates resulted to be the most efficient inhibitors of 3-hydroxymethyl-coenzyme A reductase activity when tested on the catalytic domain of the enzyme. Using the open access tools PeptideRanker and BIOPEP, a list of potentially bioactive peptides was generated: the alleged activities included the antioxidant property, the glucose uptake stimulating activity, the inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV and angiotensin-converting enzyme I.”

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Effects of Hemp seed soft capsule on colonic ion transport in rats.

“To investigate the effect of Hemp seed soft capsule (HSCC) on colonic ion transport and its related mechanisms in constipation rats.

CONCLUSION:

HSSC ameliorates constipation by increasing colonic secretion, which is mediated via the coaction of cAMP-dependent and Ca2+-dependent Cl channels, NKCC, Na+-HCO3 cotransporter or Cl/HCO3 exchanger.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29204056

https://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v23/i42/7563.htm

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Anti-neuroinflammatory effects of grossamide from hemp seed via suppression of TLR-4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 microglia cells.

Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry

“Grossamide, a representative lignanamide in hemp seed, has been reported to possess potential anti-inflammatory effects. However, the potential anti-neuroinflammatory effects and underlying mechanisms of action of grossamide are still unclear. Therefore, the present study investigated the possible effects and underlying mechanisms of grossamide against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response in BV2 microglia cells.

This study demonstrated that grossamide significantly inhibited the secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and decreased the level of LPS-mediated IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA. In addition, it significantly reduced the phosphorylation levels of NF-κB subunit p65 in a concentration-dependent manner and suppressed translocation of NF-κB p65 into the nucleus. Furthermore, grossamide markedly attenuated the LPS-induced expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88).

Taken together, these data suggest that grossamide could be a potential therapeutic candidate for inhibiting neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28224333

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11010-016-2923-7

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Identification of a sustainable two-plant diet that effectively prevents age-related metabolic syndrome and extends lifespan in aged mice.

The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry

“The current system of food production is linked to both the increasing prevalence of chronic disease and the deterioration of the environment, and thereby calls for novel ways of producing nutritious foods in a sustainable manner.

In the “longevity village” of Bama, China, we have identified two plant foods, hemp seed and bitter vegetable (Sonchus oleraceus), that are commonly consumed by its residents and grow abundantly in unfarmed land without fertilizers or pesticides.

Here, we show that a diet composed of these two foods (the “HB diet”) provides a sufficient variety of nutrients and confers significant health benefits.

Aged mice allowed ad libitum access to the HB diet not only had longer life spans and improved cognitive function but were also protected against age-related metabolic syndrome, fatty liver, gut dysbiosis and chronic inflammation compared to aged mice fed a control Western diet.

Furthermore, longevity-related genes (including 5’adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, sirtuin 1, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and forkhead box O3) were significantly up-regulated, while aging-related genes (including mammalian target of rapamycin and nuclear factor kappa B) were down-regulated.

These results demonstrate that the HB diet is capable of promoting health and longevity, and present a sustainable source of healthy foods that can help control the prevalence of chronic diseases and reduce agricultural impact on the environment.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29080417

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0955286316303461?via%3Dihub

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Detection of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in oral fluid, blood and urine following oral consumption of low-content THC hemp oil.

 Forensic Science International

“Hemp-derivative (Cannabis sativa L.) food products containing trace levels of Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are proposed for consumption in Australia and New Zealand; however, it is unclear whether use of these products will negatively affect existing drug screening protocols.

Consumption of low-content THC oil does not result in positive biological assessments.

It is therefore highly unlikely that ingestion of products containing these levels of THC will negatively impact existing region-specific drug driving enforcement protocols.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29408718

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0379073817305492?via%3Dihub

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Analysis of cannabinoids in commercial hemp seed oil and decarboxylation kinetics studies of cannabidiolic acid (CBDA).

Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis

“Hemp seed oil from Cannabis sativa L. is a very rich natural source of important nutrients, not only polyunsaturated fatty acids and proteins, but also terpenes and cannabinoids, which contribute to the overall beneficial effects of the oil.

Hence, it is important to have an analytical method for the determination of these components in commercial samples. At the same time, it is also important to assess the safety of the product in terms of amount of any psychoactive cannabinoid present therein.

This work presents the development and validation of a highly sensitive, selective and rapid HPLC-UV method for the qualitative and quantitative determination of the main cannabinoids, namely cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), cannabidiol (CBD), tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabinol (CBN), cannabigerol (CBG) and cannabidivarin (CBDV), present in 13 commercial hemp seed oils.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29182999

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0731708517322367?via%3Dihub

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Cholesterol-induced stimulation of platelet aggregation is prevented by a hempseed-enriched diet.

Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology

“Hypercholesterolemia indirectly increases the risk for myocardial infarction by enhancing the ability of platelets to aggregate.

Diets enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been shown to reduce the detrimental effects of cholesterol on platelet aggregation.

This study investigated whether dietary hempseed, a rich source of PUFAs, inhibits platelet aggregation under normal and hypercholesterolemic conditions.

The results of this study demonstrate that when hempseed is added to a cholesterol-enriched diet, cholesterol-induced platelet aggregation returns to control levels.”

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(±)-Sativamides A and B, Two Pairs of Racemic Nor-lignanamide Enantiomers from the Fruits of Cannabis sativa (Hemp Seed).

The Journal of Organic Chemistry

“(±)-Sativamides A (1) and B (2), two pairs of nor-lignanamide enantiomers featuring a unique benzo-angular triquinane skeleton, were isolated from the fruits of Cannabis sativa (hemp seed). Their structures were elucidated by detailed spectroscopic analysis and ECD calculations. The resolution of (+)- and (-)-sativamides A and B were achieved by chiral HPLC. Pretreatment of neuroblastoma cells with 1 and 2 significantly reduced the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced cytotoxicity.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29345463

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.joc.7b02765

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Extract of Fructus Cannabis Ameliorates Learning and Memory Impairment Induced by D-Galactose in an Aging Rats Model.

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“Hempseed (Cannabis sativa L.) has been used as a health food and folk medicine in China for centuries.

In the present study, we sought to define the underlying mechanism by which the extract of Fructus Cannabis (EFC) protects against memory impairment induced by D-galactose in rats.

To accelerate aging and induce memory impairment in rats, D-galactose (400 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally once daily for 14 weeks. EFC (200 and 400 mg/kg) was simultaneously administered intragastrically once daily in an attempt to slow the aging process.

We found that EFC significantly increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, while lowering levels of malondialdehyde in the hippocampus. Moreover, EFC dramatically elevated the organ indices of some organs, including the heart, the liver, the thymus, and the spleen. In addition, EFC improved the behavioral performance of rats treated with D-galactose in the Morris water maze. Furthermore, EFC inhibited the activation of astrocytes and remarkably attenuated phosphorylated tau and suppressed the expression of presenilin 1 in the brain of D-galactose-treated rats.

These findings suggested that EFC exhibits beneficial effects on the cognition of aging rats probably by enhancing antioxidant capacity and anti-neuroinflammation, improving immune function, and modulating tau phosphorylation and presenilin expression.”

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From “Azalla” to Anandamide: Distilling the Therapeutic Potential of Cannabinoids

Biological Psychiatry Home

“Cannabis has held a unique place in the hearts and minds of people since time immemorial: some have exalted its properties and considered it to be sacred; others have reviled it, considering it a root cause of social evil.

The Assyrians, who lived about 3000 years ago, documented the effects of cannabis on clay tablets. They referred to the plant according to its various uses: as “azalla,” when used as a medical agent; as hemp; and as “gan-zi-gun-nu”—“the drug that takes away the mind”   These seemingly contradictory properties—a substance that can be both a therapeutic agent and a corrupting psychoactive drug—have continued to puzzle us over the ensuing centuries.

As early as the 11th century, excessive cannabis use was suggested to be a cause of “moral degeneracy.”  On the other hand, the ostensible therapeutic value of cannabis was documented extensively in the early 19th century by Sir William B. O’Shaughnessy, an Irish physician working in Calcutta, India.

Given the critical role of the endocannabinoid system in modulating anxiety, it is clear that compounds that can modulate this system offer great promise as therapeutic agents for psychiatric disorders. It is therefore not surprising that the concept of medical marijuana is compelling to laypersons, clinicians, and researchers alike.

While there is not yet a robust body of literature supporting any specific psychiatric indication (despite the regulatory approval in some states of medical marijuana for specific psychiatric disorders), active lines of investigation of therapeutic targets within the endocannabinoid system offer hope for better treatment options.

The evidence at present suggests that the question of whether cannabinoids are good or bad is not dichotomous—it is likely both good and bad depending on the context of use, including dose, duration of exposure, and an individual’s genetic vulnerabilities. Therefore, the challenge that remains is to distill the good therapeutic effects of cannabinoids and thus weed out “gan-zi-gun-nu” from “azalla.””

http://www.biologicalpsychiatryjournal.com/article/S0006-3223(17)32207-2/fulltext

 

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