Cannabidiol enhances the passage of lipid nanocapsules across the blood-brain barrier both in vitro and in vivo.

 Molecular Pharmaceutics“Diseases affecting the central nervous system (CNS) should be regarded as a major health challenge due to the current lack of effective treatments given the hindrance to brain drug delivery imposed by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Since efficient brain drug delivery should not solely rely on passive targeting, active targeting of nanomedicines into the CNS is being explored. The present study is devoted to the development of lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) decorated with non-psychotropic cannabinoids as pioneering non-immunogenic brain targeting molecules and to the evaluation of their brain targeting ability both in vitro and in vivo. Noticeably, both the permeability experiments across the hCMEC/D3 cell-based in vitro BBB model and the biodistribution experiments in mice consistently demonstrated that the highest brain targeting ability was achieved with the smallest-sized cannabinoid-decorated LNCs. Importantly, the enhancement in brain targeting achieved with the conjugation of CBD to LNCs outperformed by 6-fold the enhancement observed for the G-Technology® (the main brain active strategy that has already entered clinical trials for the treatment of CNS diseases) As the transport efficiency across the BBB certainly determines the efficacy of the treatments for brain disorders, small cannabinoid-decorated LNCs represent auspicious platforms for the design and development of novel therapies for CNS diseases.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30865462

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.molpharmaceut.8b01344

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Does morning affect contribute to daily Cannabis use?

Addictive Behaviors

“Several theories posit that cannabis and other substances are used to reduce negative affect. This daily report study considered whether variations in positive and negative affect, reported each morning, contributed to the likelihood of cannabis use later that day. We also explored whether levels of positive and negative affect reported immediately after cannabis use improved, relative to that day’s morning levels. The sample included 183 men and 183 women representing heterosexual, cannabis-using couples from the community. Participants made independent, daily reports of affect and cannabis use episodes for 30 consecutive days. Using multilevel modeling, we modeled men’s and women’s use of cannabis on a given day as a function of morning levels of positive, hostile, and anxious affect, accounting for partner cannabis use that day, and mean levels of positive and negative affect. Men and women were more likely to use cannabis on a given day when morning positive affect was lower than typical for the person and when partner used cannabis that day. Neither hostile nor anxious affect contributed to later use of cannabis. Immediately after cannabis use, positive affect increased, and hostile and anxious affect decreased relative to that day’s morning levels. The improved affect immediately after use suggests a mechanism of positive reinforcement.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30856545

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S030646031831339X?via%3Dihub

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Second Cannabinoid Receptor Has the Yin to the First Receptor’s Yang

“Understanding the diverse effects that cannabis has on the human body is imperative if we hope to take advantage of its medicinal properties to treat various disorders. As such, elucidating the molecular structure of the receptors that bind endocannabinoids is a critical step toward developing selective drugs that can differentiate between the two known receptors—CB1 and CB2—for these molecules. Since the structure of the CB1 receptor was resolved a few years ago, an international team of researchers led by scientists at the iHuman Institute within ShanghaiTech University has just published the crystal structure of the human type 2 cannabinoid receptor, CB2.

Findings from the new study—published recently in Cell through an article titled “Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB2”—should be helpful in the development of drugs against inflammatory, neurodegenerative, and other diseases. The study authors compared the newly discovered structure to that of the CB1 receptor, deeming the two receptors to be the “yin and yang” of the human endocannabinoid system.”

“Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1” https://www.cell.com/fulltext/S0092-8674(16)31385-X
“Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB2” https://www.cell.com/cell/pdf/S0092-8674(18)31625-8.pdf
“This study compares newly discovered structures to those of the CB1 receptor, and deems the two receptors to be the Yin and Yang of the human endocannabinoid system, which is a signalling system that regulates biological processes such as pain, immune function, metabolism, and neuronal activities among others.” https://www.worldhealth.net/news/ying-yang-second-cannabinoid-receptor/
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Striking lung cancer response to self-administration of cannabidiol: A case report and literature review.

SAGE Journals

“In spite of new drugs, lung cancer is associated with a very poor prognosis. While targeted therapies are improving outcomes, it is not uncommon for many patients to have only a partial response, and relapse during follow-up. Thus, new drugs or re-evaluation of existing therapies used to treat other non-malignant diseases (drug repurposing) are still needed. While this research both in vitroand in vivo is being carried out, it is important to be attentive to patients where the disease responds to treatments not considered standard in clinical practice.

We report here a patient with adenocarcinoma of the lung who, after declining chemotherapy and radiotherapy, presented with tumour response following self-administration of cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive compound present in Cannabis sativa. Prior work has shown that cannabidiol may have anti-neoplastic properties and enhance the immune response to cancer.

The data presented here indicate that cannabidiol might have led to a striking response in a patient with lung cancer.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30815264

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2050313X19832160

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Cannabinoid Profiling of Hemp Seed Oil by Liquid Chromatography Coupled to High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

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“Hemp seed oil is well known for its nutraceutical, cosmetic and pharmaceutical properties due to a perfectly balanced content of omega 3 and omega 6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Its importance for human health is reflected by the success on the market of organic goods in recent years.

However, it is of utmost importance to consider that its healthy properties are strictly related to its chemical composition, which varies depending not only on the manufacturing method, but also on the hemp variety employed. In the present work, we analyzed the chemical profile of ten commercially available organic hemp seed oils. Their cannabinoid profile was evaluated by a liquid chromatography method coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

Besides tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, other 30 cannabinoids were identified for the first time in hemp seed oil.

The results obtained were processed according to an untargeted metabolomics approach. The multivariate statistical analysis showed highly significant differences in the chemical composition and, in particular, in the cannabinoid content of the hemp oils under investigation.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30815007

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpls.2019.00120/full

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Lung alveolar tissue destruction and protein citrullination in diesel exhaust exposed mouse lungs.

Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology banner

“Humanity faces an increasing impact of air pollution worldwide, including threats to human health. Air pollutants prompt and promote chronic inflammation, tumourigenesis, autoimmune and other destructive processes in the human body.

Post-translational modification of proteins, e.g. citrullination, results from damaging attacks of pollutants, including smoking, air pollution and others, rendering host tissues immunogenic. Citrullinated proteins and citrullinating enzymes, deiminases, are more prevalent in patients with COPD and correlate with ongoing inflammation and oxidative stress.

In this study, we installed an in-house-designed diesel exhaust delivery and cannabidiol vaporization system where mice were exposed to relevant, urban traffic-related levels of diesel exhaust for 14 days and assessed integrity of alveolar tissue, gene expression shifts and changes in protein content in the lungs and other tissues of exposed mice. Systemic presence of modified proteins was also tested.

The protective effect of phytocannabinoids was investigated as well.

Data obtained in our study show subacute effects of diesel exhaust on mouse lung integrity and protein content. Emphysematous changes are documented in exposed mouse lungs. In parallel, increased levels of citrulline were detected in the alveolar lung tissue and peripheral blood of exposed mice.

Pretreatment with vaporized cannabidiol ameliorated some damaging effects.

Results reported hereby provide new insights into subacute lung tissue changes that follow diesel exhaust exposure and suggest possible dietary and/or other therapeutic interventions for maintaining lung health and healthy ageing.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30801928

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bcpt.13213

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DMH-cannabidiol, a cannabidiol analog with reduced cytotoxicity, inhibits TNF production by targeting NF-kB activity by activating A2A receptor and inhibiting p38.

Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology

“Cannabidiol (CBD) is a natural compound with psychoactive therapeutic properties well described. Conversely, the immunological effects of CBD are still poorly explored. In this study, the potential anti-inflammatory effects and underlying mechanisms of CBD and its analog Dimethyl-Heptyl-Cannabidiol (DMH-CBD) were investigated using RAW 264.7 macrophages. CBD and DMH-CBD suppressed LPS-induced TNF production and NF-kB activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Both compounds reduced the NF-kB activity in a μM concentration range: CBD (IC50 = 15 μM) and DMH-CBD (IC50 = 38 μM). However, the concentrations of CBD that mediated NF-kB inhibition were similar to those that cause cytotoxicity (LC50 = 58 μM). Differently, DMH-CBD inhibited the NF-kB activation without cytotoxic effects at the same concentrations, although it provokes cytotoxicity at long-term exposure. The inhibitory action of the DMH-CBD on NF-kB activity was not related to the reduction in IkBα degradation or either p65 (NF-kB) translocation to the nucleus, although it decreased p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation. Additionally, 8-(3-Chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC), an A2Aantagonist, reversed the effect of DMH-CBD on NF-kB activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Collectively, our results demonstrated that CBD reduced the NF-kB activity at concentrations intimately associated with the reduction in cell viability, DMH-CBD reduce the NF-kB activity and by activating A2A receptors and inhibits p38 phosphorylation.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30796934

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0041008X19300663?via%3Dihub

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WHO proposes rescheduling cannabis to allow medical applications

Image result for the bmj journal“The World Health Organization has proposed rescheduling cannabis within international law to take account of the growing evidence for medical applications of the drug, reversing its position held for the past 60 years that cannabis should not be used in legitimate medical practice.”

https://www.bmj.com/content/364/bmj.l574

“WHO RECOMMENDS RESCHEDULING #CANNABIS IN INTERNATIONAL LAW FOR FIRST TIME IN HISTORY. The World Health Organization has suggested that cannabis should be downgraded, or “rescheduled,” given the mounting evidence showing that the drug could prove beneficial in treating a number of health problems. This marks a significant change in WHO’s position, which for the last 60 years has said that cannabis should not be used in medicine, according to an article in the BMJ.” https://www.newsweek.com/who-recommends-rescheduling-cannabis-international-law-first-time-history-1324613
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A Review of Human Studies Assessing Cannabidiol’s (CBD) Therapeutic Actions and Potential.

Publication cover image

“Cannabidiol (CBD) is a highly touted product for many different disorders among the lay press. Numerous CBD products are available, ranging from a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved product called Epidiolex to products created for medical marijuana dispensaries and products sold in smoke shops, convenience stores, and over the Internet.

The legal status of the non-FDA-approved products differs depending on the source of the CBD and the state, while the consistency and quality of the non-FDA-approved products vary markedly. Without independent laboratory verification, it is impossible to know whether the labeled CBD dosage in non-FDA-approved CBD products is correct, that the delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol content is <0.3%, and that it is free of adulteration and contamination.

On the Internet, CBD has been touted for many ailments for which it has not been studied, and in those diseases with evaluable human data, it generally has weak or very weak evidence. The control of refractory seizures is a clear exception, with strong evidence of CBD’s benefit. Acute CBD dosing before anxiety-provoking events like public speaking and the chronic use of CBD in schizophrenia are promising but not proven. CBD is not risk free, with adverse events (primarily somnolence and gastrointestinal in nature) and drug interactions. CBD has been shown to increase liver function tests and needs further study to assess its impact on suicidal ideation.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30730563

https://accp1.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jcph.1387

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Cannabisin F from Hemp (Cannabis sativa) Seed Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses in BV2 Microglia as SIRT1 Modulator.

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“Hemp seed (Fructus cannabis) is rich in lignanamides, and initial biological screening tests showed their potential anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative capacity.

This study investigated the possible effects and underlying mechanism of cannabisin F, a hempseed lignanamide, against inflammatory response and oxidative stress in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia cells.

Cannabisin F suppressed the production and the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in a concentration-dependent manner in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglia cell. Furthermore, cannabisin F enhanced SIRT1 expression and blocked LPS-induced NF-κB (Nuclear factor kappa B) signaling pathway activation by inhibiting phosphorylation of IκBα (Inhibit proteins of nuclear factor kappaB) and NF-κB p65. And the SIRT1 inhibitor EX527 significantly inhibited the effect of cannabisin F on pro-inflammatory cytokines production, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabisin F are SIRT1-dependent. In addition, cannabisin F reduced the production of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and promoted the expression of Nrf2 (Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2) and HO-1 (Heme Oxygenase-1), suggesting that the anti-oxidative effects of cannabisin F are related to Nrf2 signaling pathway.

Collectively, these results suggest that the neuro-protection effect of cannabisin F against LPS-induced inflammatory response and oxidative stress in BV2 microglia cells involves the SIRT1/NF-κB and Nrf2 pathway.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30691004

https://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/20/3/507

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