Cannabis and multiple sclerosis.

BMJ Journals

“Patients with multiple sclerosis have long turned to complementary therapies to manage symptoms that licensed products can only partially control. Around half of patients with multiple sclerosis admit to previous or current cannabis use for medicinal purposes and would endorse legalisation. Despite many governments worldwide relaxing regulations around medicinal cannabis, there remain many unanswered questions as to how clinicians should prescribe or recommend products, and access to pharmaceutical-grade products remains highly restricted. Here we address what adult neurologists need to know about cannabis and its use in multiple sclerosis.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31201234

https://pn.bmj.com/content/early/2019/06/14/practneurol-2018-002137

“There are many anectodal reports of multiple sclerosis (MS) sufferers using the drug and reporting beneficial effects on spasticity, pain, tremor and mood.”  https://pn.bmj.com/content/2/3/154?int_source=trendmd&int_campaign=usage-042019&int_medium=cpc

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Endogenous and synthetic cannabinoids induce the downregulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor in retina.

Experimental Eye Research

“Endogenous and synthetic cannabinoids have been shown to provide neuroprotection to retinal neurons in acute animal models of retinopathy.

Chronic exposure to cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) agonists has been reported to induce downregulation of the CB1R in brain and behavioral tolerance.

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of subchronic/chronic cannabinoid administration on CB1R downregulation in normal rat retina, its downstream prosurvival signaling and subsequent effect on retinal neuroprotection against AMPA excitotoxicity.

This study provides novel information regarding agonist-induced CB1R downregulation in rat retina after subchronic/chronic cannabinoid treatment, and its effect on downstream prosurvival signaling and neuroprotection.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31199905

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014483519301216?via%3Dihub

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The Important Role of the Endocannabinoid System and the Endocannabinoidome in Gut Health.

Image result for Altern Ther Health Med journal “The endocannabinoid system is an endogenous pathway comprised of the cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands known as endocannabinoids, and the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation. The endocannabinoidome extends this system to include other receptors such as TRPV1, PPARα, GPR55 and 5-HT1A. An extensive amount of research is now linking the endocannabinoidome to intestinal health through fascinating mechanisms that include endocannabinoid receptor expression in the gut and interplay with the intestinal microbiota. A dysregulated endocannabinoid system may lead to inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31202201

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The Endocannabinoid System and its Modulation by Cannabidiol (CBD).

Image result for Altern Ther Health Med. “The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is an extensive endogenous signaling system with multiple elements, the number of which may be increasing as scientists continue to elucidate its role in human health and disease. The ECS is seemingly ubiquitous in animal species and is modulated by diet, sleep, exercise, stress, and a multitude of other factors, including exposure to phytocannabinoids, like Cannabidiol (CBD). Modulating the activity of this system may offer tremendous therapeutic promise for a diverse scope of diseases, ranging from mental health disorders, neurological and movement disorders, pain, autoimmune disease, spinal cord injury, cancer, cardiometabolic disease, stroke, TBI, osteoporosis, and others.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31202198

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Should donors who have used marijuana be considered candidates for living kidney donation?

Clinical Kidney Journal “The use of marijuana in the USA has been steadily increasing over the last 10 years. This study is the first to investigate the effect of marijuana use by live kidney donors upon outcomes in both donors and recipients.

There was no difference in donor or recipient perioperative characteristics or postoperative outcomes based upon donor marijuana use (P > 0.05 for all comparisons). There was no difference in renal function between NMUD and MUD groups and no long-term difference in kidney allograft function between NMKR and MKR groups.

 

CONCLUSIONS:

Considering individuals with a history of marijuana use for living kidney donation could increase the donor pool and yield acceptable outcomes.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31198546

“There is no difference in renal function between MUD and NMUD groups following kidney donation. In addition, there is no difference between MKR and NMKR groups following transplant. If current trends persist into the future, then there will be a further increase in both recreational and medicinal marijuana use. For this reason, the growing population of marijuana users will become an even more significant segment of the potential living kidney donor pool. Subsequently, consideration of marijuana using kidney donors could increase the donor pool.”

https://academic.oup.com/ckj/article/12/3/437/5145154

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Cannabis treatment in hospitalized patients using the SYQE inhaler: Results of a pilot open-label study.

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“The objectives were to evaluate the, usability, feasibility of use, satisfaction, and safety of the Syqe Inhaler Exo (Syqe Inhaler), a metered dose, Pharmacokinetics-validated, cannabis inhaler device in a cohort of hospitalized patients that were using medical cannabis under license as a part of their ongoing medical treatment.

Before and after inhaling from the Syqe Inhaler, participants were asked to fill a questionnaire regarding pain reduction on a visual analog scale from 0 to 10 and, if relevant, reduction in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and/or spasticity. A patient satisfaction questionnaire and a usability questionnaire were filled in following the last use. Prescribed treatment included 4 daily doses of 500 μg tetrahydrocannabinol each delivered from 16 mg cannabis flos per inhalation plus up to an additional four SOS (distress code for more doses of cannabis) doses.

Result: Daily cannabis dose consumed during hospitalization with the Syqe Inhaler was 51 mg (20-96) versus 1,000 mg (660-3,300) consumed prehospitalization. Patients were easily trained and continued to use Syqe Inhaler for the duration of their hospitalization (5 [3-7] days).

Pain intensity 30-60 minutes following inhalations was reported to be significantly lower than preinhalation 4 [1-5] versus 7 [2-9]). Participants ranked their satisfaction with Syqe Inhaler as 6 (5-7). Three participants reported mild cough, which resolved spontaneously.

Significance of results: Cannabis inhalation by combustion is not feasible for hospitalized patients. The use of Syqe Inhaler during hospitalization yielded high levels of patients and staff satisfaction with no complications.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31196236

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/palliative-and-supportive-care/article/cannabis-treatment-in-hospitalized-patients-using-the-syqe-inhaler-results-of-a-pilot-openlabel-study/0C1940413E704A7EADCB949F5F49603A

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Cannabidiol Overcomes Oxaliplatin Resistance by Enhancing NOS3- and SOD2-Induced Autophagy in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

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“Although oxaliplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic drug for colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment, patients often develop resistance to it. Therefore, a new strategy for CRC treatment is needed.

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cannabidiol(CBD), one of the components of the cannabis plant, in overcoming oxaliplatin resistance in CRC cells.

Taken together, these results suggest that elevated phosphorylation of NOS3 is essential for oxaliplatin resistance. The combination of oxaliplatin and CBD decreased NOS3 phosphorylation, which resulted in autophagy, by inducing the overproduction of ROS through mitochondrial dysfunction, thus overcoming oxaliplatin resistance.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31195721

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6694/11/6/781

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Effectiveness and tolerability of THC:CBD oromucosal spray as add-on measure in patients with severe chronic pain: analysis of 12-week open-label real-world data provided by the German Pain e-Registry.

Image result for J Pain Res.

“Objective: To evaluate effectiveness, tolerability and safety of an oromucosal spray containing Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), as add-on treatment in patients with severe chronic pain (SCP).

Conclusion: THC:CBD oromucosal spray proved to be an effective and well-tolerated add-on treatment for patients with elsewhere refractory chronic pain – especially of neuropathic origin.”

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Dramatic response to Laetrile and cannabidiol (CBD) oil in a patient with metastatic low grade serous ovarian carcinoma.

Gynecologic Oncology Reports

“Complimentary alternative medicine use is common in women with gynecologic cancers. Cannabinoid receptors are potential therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer. Communication with patients is critical regarding use of alternative therapies.”  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31193514

In this case report, we present the case of a female patient who demonstrated disease response after declining standard therapy and taking a combination of Laetrile and CBD oil. Previous clinical trials in humans have demonstrated no therapeutic effect in cancer patients taking Laetrile. However, basic science studies have identified cannabinoid receptors in ovarian cancer as potential therapeutic targets for cannabinoid use in treating malignancy.

In this case report, we highlight a dramatic response to combination Laetrile and CBD oil in a patient with widely metastatic Low grade serous ovarian cancer (LGSOC).

Laetrile is a semi-synthetic version of amygdaline, a chemical compound found in plants and fruit seeds. Both Laetrile and amygdaline contain cyanide within a common structural component. Theoretically, Laetrile has anti-cancer effects when cyanide is released via enzymatic degradation. However, a Cochrane review published in 2015 found no randomized or quasi randomized control trials supporting the use of Laetrile in cancer patients. Further, they argued that due to the risk of cyanide poisoning, Laetrile use should be discouraged in patients seeking the compound for alternative cancer therapy. Concerns for toxicity in combination with inability to demonstrate clinical efficacy led to an effective ban on the substance by the FDA in the 1980s. Nevertheless, the substance remains available for purchase in variable formulations commercially.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a compound naturally derived from the cannabis plant.

The anti-cancer effects of CBD have been evaluated predominantly in the laboratory setting. Interestingly, ovarian cancer cell lines express GPR55, a target that is inhibited indirectly by CBD and that plays a role in prostate and ovarian cancer cell proliferation. Mouse model studies have also demonstrated cannabinoids inhibit tumor cell growth and induce apoptosis in gliomas, lymphomas, prostate, breast, lung, skin, and pancreatic cancer cells.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352578919300517?via%3Dihub

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Selective modulation of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor as an emerging platform for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

“Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system, and it may arise from illness, be drug-induced or caused by toxin exposure. Since the discovery of two G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) nearly three decades ago, there has been a rapid expansion in our understanding of cannabinoid pharmacology. This is currently one of the most active fields of neuropharmacology, and interest has emerged in developing cannabinoids and other small molecule modulators of CB1 and CB2 as therapeutics for neuropathic pain. This short review article provides an overview of the chemotypes currently under investigation for the development of novel neuropathic pain treatments targeting CB1 receptors.”

Graphical abstract: Selective modulation of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor as an emerging platform for the treatment of neuropathic pain
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