A Phase I, Open-Label, Parallel-Group, Single-Dose Trial of the Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Tolerability of Cannabidiol in Subjects with Mild to Severe Renal Impairment.

“As patients who receive cannabidiol (CBD) may have co-existing renal morbidities, it is important to understand whether dose adjustments are necessary to mitigate the risk of exposure-related toxicity. This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of CBD in patients with renal impairment.

METHODS:

The pharmacokinetics and safety of a single oral 200 mg dose of a plant-derived pharmaceutical formulation of highly purified CBD in oral solution (Epidiolex® in the USA; 100 mg/mL) were assessed in subjects with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment (n = 8/group) relative to matched subjects with normal renal function (n = 8). Blood samples were collected until 48 h post-dose and evaluated by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Analysis of variance was used to compare primary pharmacokinetic parameters (maximum measured plasma concentration [Cmax], oral clearance of drug from plasma [CL/F], renal clearance [CLR], area under the plasma concentration-time curve [AUC] from time zero to last measurable concentration [AUCt], and AUC from time zero to infinity [AUC]); descriptive analysis was used for secondary pharmacokinetic parameters (time to Cmax [tmax], terminal [elimination] half-life [t½], cumulative amount excreted from time zero to the last quantifiable sample [Aelast], and fraction of the systemically available drug excreted into the urine [fe]).

RESULTS:

No statistically significant differences were observed in Cmax, AUCt, AUC, or tmax values between subjects with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment and subjects with normal renal function for CBD or its major metabolites, 7-carboxy-CBD (7-COOH-CBD) and 7-hydroxy-CBD (7-OH-CBD), and minor metabolite, 6-hydroxy-CBD (6-OH-CBD); geometric mean ratio for Cmax values ranged from 0.68 to 1.35. No differences were observed for other secondary parameters (Aelast and fe). CBD, 7-COOH-CBD, 7-OH-CBD, and 6-OH-CBD were highly protein bound (> 90%); binding was similar in all subject groups. Urine analysis for CBD recorded no appreciable amount, and thus no urinary pharmacokinetic parameters could be derived. Adverse events (AEs) affected two subjects; all five AEs were mild in severity and resolved during the trial. There were no serious AEs or discontinuations due to AEs. Laboratory, physical examination, vital sign, and 12-lead electrocardiogram findings were not clinically significant.

CONCLUSION:

Renal impairment had no effect on the metabolism of CBD after a single oral 200 mg dose. CBD was generally well tolerated in subjects with varying degrees of renal function.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31802404

“Renal impairment status had no effect on CBD pharmacokinetics following a single oral 200 mg dose, with no statistically significant effects on Cmax, AUCt, AUC, or tmax. CBD was generally well tolerated; there were no serious or severe AEs, and no new safety concerns were identified.”

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs40262-019-00841-6

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Cannabinoid-2 receptor activation ameliorates hepatorenal syndrome.

Free Radical Biology and Medicine“Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a life-threatening complication of end-stage liver disease characterized by the rapid decline of kidney function. Herein, we explored the therapeutic potential of targeting the cannabinoid 2 receptor (CB2-R) utilizing a commonly used mouse model of liver fibrosis and hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), induced by bile duct ligation (BDL).

KEY RESULTS:

We found that liver injury triggered marked inflammation and oxidative stress also in the kidneys of BDL-operated mice. We detected pronounced histopathological alterations with tubular injury paralleled with increased inflammation, oxidative/nitrative stress and fibrotic remodeling both in hepatic and renal tissues as well as endothelial activation and markedly impaired renal microcirculation. This was accompanied by increased CB2-R expression in both liver and the kidney tissues of diseased animals. A selective CB2-R agonist, HU-910, markedly decreased numerous markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis both in the liver and in the kidneys. HU-910 also attenuated markers of kidney injury and improved the impaired renal microcirculation in BDL-operated mice.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that oxidative stress, inflammation and microvascular dysfunction are key events in the pathogenesis of BDL-associated renal failure. Furthermore, we demonstrate that targeting the CB2-R by selective agonists may represent a promising new avenue to treat HRS by attenuating tissue and vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, fibrosis and consequent microcirculatory dysfunction in the kidneys.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31770583

“Bile duct ligation (BDL) causes hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Oxidative damage/inflammation drives liver and kidney injury following BDL. Cannabinoid-2 receptor (CB2-R) activation attenuates hepatic damage in BDL. CB2-R activation mitigates the renal inflammation and oxidative damage in BDL. CB2-R activation attenuates renal microcirculatory dysfunction in BDL.”

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Altered cannabinoid receptor expression in pancreatic islets in experimental model of uremia.

Folia Morphologica “Uremia leads to a number of metabolic and hormonal disorders including defective carbohydrate metabolism.

Endocannabinoids exert their effect on insulin and glucagon secretion via activation of specific receptors named CB1 and CB2. For this reason and the absence of reports on location and immunoreactivity of CB1, CB2 receptors compared to immunoreactivity of insulin- and glucagon- secreting cells in experimental uremia, the author decided to investigate this issue.

The aim of the present study was the immunohistochemical localization and evaluation of cannabinoid receptors (CB1, CB2), insulin and glucagon in the pancreatic islets of uremic rats.

RESULTS:

It was revealed the decreased immunoreactivity of the CB1 receptor and higher intensity of the immunohistochemical reaction against CB2 receptor as compared to the value in the control animals. Significantly higher immunoreactivity of glucagon-positive cells and weaker immunoreactivity of insulin-positive cells were observed in pancreatic islets of uremic rats.

CONCLUSIONS:

The obtained results indicate the involvement of cannabinoid receptors in the pathomechanism of carbohydrate metabolism disorders, associated with abnormal secretion of hormones by the α and β cells in uremia.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31625133

https://journals.viamedica.pl/folia_morphologica/article/view/64828

“Uremia is a clinical syndrome marked by elevated concentrations of urea in the blood and associated with fluid, electrolyte, and hormone imbalances and metabolic abnormalities, which develop in parallel with deterioration of renal function.  The term uremia, which literally means urine in the blood, was first used by Piorry to describe the clinical condition associated with renal failure”  https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/245296-overview

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The cannabinoid receptor 1 is involved in renal fibrosis during chronic allograft dysfunction: Proof of concept.

Publication cover image“Chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD), defined as the replacement of functional renal tissue by extracellular matrix proteins, remains the first cause of graft loss.

The aim of our study was to explore the potential role of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) during CAD.

Overall, our study strongly suggests an involvement of the cannabinoid system in the progression of fibrosis during CAD and indicates the therapeutic potential of CB1 antagonists in this pathology.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31469511

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jcmm.14570

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Dual Inhibition of Cannabinoid-1 Receptor and iNOS Attenuates Obesity-induced Chronic Kidney Disease.

British Journal of Pharmacology banner“Obesity, an important risk factor for developing chronic kidney disease (CKD), affects the kidneys by two main molecular signaling pathways: the endocannabinoid/CB1 R system, whose activation in obesity promotes renal inflammation, fibrosis, and injury; and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which generates reactive oxygen species resulting in oxidative stress. Hence, a combined peripheral inhibitory molecule that targets both CB1 R and iNOS may serve as an efficacious therapeutic agent against obesity-induced CKD.

KEY RESULTS:

Enhanced expression of CB1 R and iNOS in renal tubules was found in human kidney patients with obesity and other CKDs. The hybrid inhibitor ameliorated obesity-induced kidney morphological and functional changes via decreasing kidney inflammation, fibrosis, oxidative stress, and renal injury. Some of these features were independent of the improved metabolic profile mediated via inhibition of CB1 R. An additional interesting finding is that these beneficial effects on the kidney were partially associated with modulating renal adiponectin signaling.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Collectively, our results highlight the therapeutic relevance of blocking CB1 R and iNOS in ameliorating obesity-induced CKD.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31454063

https://bpspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bph.14849

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The protective effect of cannabinoid type 2 receptor activation on renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

“Kidney ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury is an important health problem resulting in acute renal failure. After IR, the inflammatory and apoptotic process is triggered.

The relation of Cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor with inflammatory and apoptotic process has been determined. The CB2 receptor has been shown to be localized in glomeruli and tubules in human and rat kidney. Activation of CB2 receptor with JWH-133 has been shown to reduce apoptosis and inflammation.

In this study, it was investigated whether CB2 activation with selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH-133 was protective against renal IR injury.

We found that JWH-133 and CB2 receptor activation had a curative effect against kidney IR damage. JWH-133 may be a new therapeutic agent in preventing kidney IR damage.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31446615

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11010-019-03616-6

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Endocannabinoid System and the Kidneys: From Renal Physiology to Injury and Disease.

View details for Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research cover image“As the prevalence of kidney disease continues to rise worldwide, there is accumulating evidence that kidney injury and dysfunction, whether acute or chronic, is associated with major adverse outcomes, including mortality. Meanwhile, effective therapeutic options in the treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been sparse.

Many of the effective treatments that are routinely utilized for different pathologies in patients without kidney disease have failed to demonstrate efficacy in those with renal dysfunction. Hence, there is an urgent need for discovery of novel pathways that can be targeted for innovative and effective clinical therapies in renal disease states.

There is now accumulating evidence that the endocannabinoid (EC) system plays a prominent role in normal renal homeostasis and function. In addition, numerous recent studies have described mechanisms through which alteration in the EC system can contribute to kidney damage and disease. These include a potential role for cannabinoid receptors in tubulo-glomerular damage and fibrosis, which are common features of AKI, interstitial nephritis, glomerulopathy, and other conditions leading to AKI and CKD.

These findings suggest that manipulating the EC system may be an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of kidney disease and injury. However, further mechanistic studies are needed to fully delineate the role of this system in various conditions affecting the kidneys. Furthermore, while most of the current literature is focused on the role of the EC system as a whole in renal pathophysiology, future studies will also need to clarify the contribution of each component of this system, including the EC mediators, in the pathogenesis of kidney disease and their potential role as part of a therapeutic strategy.”

FIG. 1. 
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Should donors who have used marijuana be considered candidates for living kidney donation?

Clinical Kidney Journal “The use of marijuana in the USA has been steadily increasing over the last 10 years. This study is the first to investigate the effect of marijuana use by live kidney donors upon outcomes in both donors and recipients.

There was no difference in donor or recipient perioperative characteristics or postoperative outcomes based upon donor marijuana use (P > 0.05 for all comparisons). There was no difference in renal function between NMUD and MUD groups and no long-term difference in kidney allograft function between NMKR and MKR groups.

 

CONCLUSIONS:

Considering individuals with a history of marijuana use for living kidney donation could increase the donor pool and yield acceptable outcomes.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31198546

“There is no difference in renal function between MUD and NMUD groups following kidney donation. In addition, there is no difference between MKR and NMKR groups following transplant. If current trends persist into the future, then there will be a further increase in both recreational and medicinal marijuana use. For this reason, the growing population of marijuana users will become an even more significant segment of the potential living kidney donor pool. Subsequently, consideration of marijuana using kidney donors could increase the donor pool.”

https://academic.oup.com/ckj/article/12/3/437/5145154

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Cannabis: From a Plant That Modulates Feeding Behaviors toward Developing Selective Inhibitors of the Peripheral Endocannabinoid System for the Treatment of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome.

toxins-logo “In this review, we discuss the role of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in regulating energy and metabolic homeostasis. Endocannabinoids, via activating the cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R), are commonly known as mediators of the thrifty phenotype hypothesis due to their activity in the central nervous system, which in turn regulates food intake and underlies the development of metabolic syndrome. Indeed, these findings led to the clinical testing of globally acting CB1R blockers for obesity and various metabolic complications. However, their therapeutic potential was halted due to centrally mediated adverse effects. Recent observations that highlighted the key role of the peripheral eCB system in metabolic regulation led to the preclinical development of various novel compounds that block CB1R only in peripheral organs with very limited brain penetration and without causing behavioral side effects. These unique molecules, which effectively ameliorate obesity, type II diabetes, fatty liver, insulin resistance, and chronic kidney disease in several animal models, are likely to be further developed in the clinic and may revive the therapeutic potential of blocking CB1R once again.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31096702

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6651/11/5/275

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The effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on Krüppel-like factor-4 expression, redox homeostasis, and inflammation in the kidney of diabetic rat.

Publication cover image

“Diabetes mellitus is a complex, multifactorial disorder that is attributed to pancreatic β cell dysfunction. Pancreatic β cell dysfunction results in declining utilization of glucose by peripheral tissues as kidney and it leads to nephropathy. Excessive production and accumulation of free radicals and incapable antioxidant defense system lead to impaired redox status. Macromolecular damage may occur due to impaired redox status and also immune imbalance.

Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main active ingredient in cannabis. THC acts as an immunomodulator and an antioxidant agent.

Our aim was to evaluate the effects of THC in the diabetic kidney.

According to our data, THC has ameliorative effects on the impaired redox status of diabetic kidney and also it acts as an immunomodulator. Therefore, THC might be used as a therapeutic agent for diabetic kidneys but its usage in the healthy kidney may show adverse effects.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31081965

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jcb.28903

“Marijuana Doesn’t Seem to Harm the Kidneys” https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/news/20180306/marijuana-doesnt-seem-to-harm-the-kidneys

“Pot Won’t Harm Healthy Young People’s Kidneys, Study Suggests”   https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=206375

“Marijuana doesn’t appear to harm kidneys”   https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/hsph-in-the-news/marijuana-kidneys/

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