Application of Cannabinoids in Neurosciences: Considerations and Implications.

 Current Issue Cover Image“Medicinal cannabinoid use continues to evolve across the United States, although legitimate federal recognition for medicinal purpose is lacking. Variability exists across states within the United States with respect to legislation, and health care institutions encounter challenges when patients present with a history of medicinal cannabinoid use. Emerging evidence in the field of neurosciences suggests a role of cannabinoids for neurologic medical conditions such as Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, and epilepsy. We aim to provide an overview of cannabinoids including a historical perspective, pharmacology, applications in neurosciences, and challenges in health care and academia. Knowledge of the appropriate role of cannabinoids in the clinical setting is essential for all health care practitioners including nursing.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32084064

https://journals.lww.com/ccnq/Abstract/2020/04000/Application_of_Cannabinoids_in_Neurosciences_.9.aspx

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Epilepsy and cannabidiol: a guide to treatment.

 Image result for Epileptic Disord. journal“The growing interest in cannabidiol (CBD), specifically a pure form of CBD, as a treatment for epilepsy, among other conditions, is reflected in recent changes in legislation in some countries.

Although there has been much speculation about the therapeutic value of cannabis-based products as an anti-seizure treatment for some time, it is only within the last two years that Class I evidence has been available for a pure form of CBD, based on placebo-controlled RCTs for patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome.

However, just as we are beginning to understand the significance of CBD as a treatment for epilepsy, in recent years, a broad spectrum of products advertised to contain CBD has emerged on the market. The effects of these products are fundamentally dependent on the purity, preparation, and concentration of CBD and other components, and consensus and standardisation are severely lacking regarding their preparation, composition, usage and effectiveness.

This review aims to provide information to neurologists and epileptologists on the therapeutic value of CBD products, principally a purified form, in routine practice for patients with intractable epilepsy.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32096470

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Cannabinoids in the Treatment of Back Pain.

Image result for neurosurgery journal“Marijuana is increasingly utilized for the treatment of multiple medical problems, including back pain, in the United States. Although there is strong preclinical evidence supporting the promise of cannabinoids in the treatment of back pain, there is a paucity of clinical data supporting their use in clinical practice. Opioids are an important medication for the treatment of acute and chronic back pain, but utilization of opioid-based regimens have likely contributed to the growing opioid epidemic. The significant risk of morbidity, mortality, and dependence secondary to opioid medications have increased the interest in nonopioid medications, including cannabinoid-based pain regimens, in treating back pain. This review will provide an overview on the pharmacology, drug delivery methods, clinical evidence, and safety considerations critical to understanding the potential role of cannabinoids in the treatment of back pain.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32097466

https://academic.oup.com/neurosurgery/advance-article/doi/10.1093/neuros/nyz573/5758016

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Localization of cannabinoid and cannabinoid related receptors in the cat gastrointestinal tract.

Image result for Histochem Cell Biol journal “A growing body of literature indicates that activation of cannabinoid receptors may exert beneficial effects on gastrointestinal inflammation and visceral hypersensitivity.

The present study aimed to immunohistochemically investigate the distribution of the canonical cannabinoid receptors CB1 (CB1R) and CB2 (CB2R) and the putative cannabinoid receptors G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55), nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and serotonin receptor 5-HT1a 5-HT1aR) in tissue samples of the gastrointestinal tract of the cat.

CB1R-immunoreactivity (CB1R-IR) was observed in gastric epithelial cells, intestinal enteroendocrine cells (EECs) and goblet cells, lamina propria mast cells (MCs), and enteric neurons. CB2R-IR was expressed by EECs, enterocytes, and macrophages. GPR55-IR was expressed by EECs, macrophages, immunocytes, and MP neurons. PPARα-IR was expressed by immunocytes, smooth muscle cells, and enteroglial cells. TRPA1-IR was expressed by enteric neurons and intestinal goblet cells. 5-HT1a receptor-IR was expressed by gastrointestinal epithelial cells and gastric smooth muscle cells.

Cannabinoid receptors showed a wide distribution in the feline gastrointestinal tract layers. Although not yet confirmed/supported by functional evidences, the present research might represent an anatomical substrate potentially useful to support, in feline species, the therapeutic use of cannabinoids during gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32095931

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Secondary Metabolites Profiled in Cannabis Inflorescences, Leaves, Stem Barks, and Roots for Medicinal Purposes.

Scientific Reports “Cannabis research has historically focused on the most prevalent cannabinoids. However, extracts with a broad spectrum of secondary metabolites may have increased efficacy and decreased adverse effects compared to cannabinoids in isolation.

Cannabis’s complexity contributes to the length and breadth of its historical usage, including the individual application of the leaves, stem barks, and roots, for which modern research has not fully developed its therapeutic potential. This study is the first attempt to profile secondary metabolites groups in individual plant parts comprehensively.

We profiled 14 cannabinoids, 47 terpenoids (29 monoterpenoids, 15 sesquiterpenoids, and 3 triterpenoids), 3 sterols, and 7 flavonoids in cannabis flowers, leaves, stem barks, and roots in three chemovars available. Cannabis inflorescence was characterized by cannabinoids (15.77-20.37%), terpenoids (1.28-2.14%), and flavonoids (0.07-0.14%); the leaf by cannabinoids (1.10-2.10%), terpenoids (0.13-0.28%), and flavonoids (0.34-0.44%); stem barks by sterols (0.07-0.08%) and triterpenoids (0.05-0.15%); roots by sterols (0.06-0.09%) and triterpenoids (0.13-0.24%).

This comprehensive profile of bioactive compounds can form a baseline of reference values useful for research and clinical studies to understand the “entourage effect” of cannabis as a whole, and also to rediscover therapeutic potential for each part of cannabis from their traditional use by applying modern scientific methodologies.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32094454

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-60172-6

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Targeting Peripherally Restricted Cannabinoid Receptor 1, Cannabinoid Receptor 2, and Endocannabinoid-Degrading Enzymes for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain Including Neuropathic Orofacial Pain.

ijms-logo“Neuropathic pain conditions including neuropathic orofacial pain (NOP) are difficult to treat. Contemporary therapeutic agents for neuropathic pain are often ineffective in relieving pain and are associated with various adverse effects. Finding new options for treating neuropathic pain is a major priority in pain-related research.

Cannabinoid-based therapeutic strategies have emerged as promising new options.

Cannabinoids mainly act on cannabinoid 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) receptors, and the former is widely distributed in the brain. The therapeutic significance of cannabinoids is masked by their adverse effects including sedation, motor impairment, addiction and cognitive impairment, which are thought to be mediated by CB1 receptors in the brain. Alternative approaches have been developed to overcome this problem by selectively targeting CB2 receptors, peripherally restricted CB1 receptors and endocannabinoids that may be locally synthesized on demand at sites where their actions are pertinent.

Many preclinical studies have reported that these strategies are effective for treating neuropathic pain and produce no or minimal side effects.

Recently, we observed that inhibition of degradation of a major endocannabinoid, 2-arachydonoylglycerol, can attenuate NOP following trigeminal nerve injury in mice. This review will discuss the above-mentioned alternative approaches that show potential for treating neuropathic pain including NOP.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32093166

https://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/21/4/1423

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Anti-inflammatory Potential of Terpenes Present in Cannabis sativa L.

Go to Volume 0, Issue 0 “Cannabis sativa L. (C. sativa) contains an array of plant-derived (phyto) cannabinoids and terpenes that are predominantly located in the trichome cavity of the plant. Terpenes, aromatic organic hydrocarbons characterized for their role in plant protection/pollination, are gaining attention for their potential as novel therapeutics in many areas of biomedicine. This Viewpoint will explore the exciting recent evidence that terpenes have anti-inflammatory/antioxidant propensity by targeting inflammatory signaling mechanisms relevant to human disease. Given their anti-inflammatory properties, terpenes may contribute to the effects of current cannabinoid-based therapies.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32091871

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acschemneuro.0c00075

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Cannabinoid agonists possibly mediate interaction between cholinergic and cannabinoid systems in regulating intestinal inflammation.

Medical Hypotheses“Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is idiopathic, chronic and affects the gastrointestinal tract. It results from the association of genetic, environmental and immune deregulation, which culminates in the development and progression of the inflammatory process. In an attempt to reverse colonic inflammation, endogenous systems involved in intestinal physiology are studied and the cholinergic system is fundamental for this process. In addition, this system has anti-inflammatory action in experimental models of IBD. Another important endogenous system in regulating the exacerbated inflammatory response in the gut is mediated by endocannabinoids, which play an important role in restoring bowel functionality after the onset of the inflammatory process. There are several reports in the literature showing the interconnection between the cannabinoid and cholinergic systems in different tissues. Considering that the activation of the cholinergic system stimulates the production of cannabinoid agonists in the intestine, our hypothesis is that the interaction between the muscarinic system and the cannabinoid in the control of intestinal inflammation is mediated by endogenous cannabinoids, since they are stimulated by the activation of muscarinic receptors.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32085982

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S030698771931429X?via%3Dihub

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

“Recent advances in the understanding of the aetiology and therapeutic strategies in burning mouth syndrome: focus on the actions of cannabinoids”.

European Journal of Neuroscience“Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a neuropathic pain disorder associated with a burning sensation on oral mucosal surfaces with frequently reported xerostomia, dysgeusia and tingling or paraesthetic sensations. However, patients present no clinically evident causative lesions. The poor classification of the disorder has resulted in a diagnostic challenge, particularly for the clinician/dentist evaluating these individuals. Major research developments have been made in the BMS field in recent years to address this concern, principally in terms of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disorder, in addition to therapeutic advancements. For the purpose of this review, an update on the pathophysiological mechanisms will be discussed from a neuropathic, immunological, hormonal and psychological perspective. This review will also focus on the many therapeutic strategies that have been explored for BMS, including antidepressants/antipsychotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, hormone replacement therapies, phytotherapeutic compounds and non-pharmacological interventions, overall highlighting the lack of controlled clinical studies to support the effectiveness of such therapeutic avenues. Particular focus is given to the cannabinoid system, and the potential of cannabis-based therapeutics in managing BMS patients.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32091630

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ejn.14712

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Cannabis and the exocannabinoid and endocannabinoid systems. Their use and controversies.

“Cannabis (marijuana) is one of the most consumed psychoactive substances in the world. The term marijuana is of Mexican origin. The primary cannabinoids that have been studied to date include cannabidiol and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, which is responsible for most cannabis physical and psychotropic effects. Recently, the endocannabinoid system was discovered, which is made up of receptors, ligands and enzymes that are widely expressed in the brain and its periphery, where they act to maintain balance in several homeostatic processes. Exogenous cannabinoids or naturally-occurring phytocannabinoids interact with the endocannabinoid system. Marijuana must be processed in a laboratory to extract tetrahydrocannabinol and leave cannabidiol, which is the product that can be marketed. Some studies suggest cannabidiol has great potential for therapeutic use as an agent with antiepileptic, analgesic, anxiolytic, antipsychotic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties; however, the findings on cannabinoids efficacy and cannabis-based medications tolerability-safety for some conditions are inconsistent. More scientific evidence is required in order to generate recommendations on the use of medicinal cannabis.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32091020

http://gacetamedicademexico.com/frame_eng.php?id=348

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous