Antioxidant and Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Peptides Obtained from Alcalase Protein Hydrolysate Fractions of Hemp ( Cannabis sativa L.) Bran

Go to Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry “Proteins from hemp bran (HPB), a byproduct of the hemp seed food-processing chain, were chemically extracted, hydrolyzed by Alcalase, and separated by membrane ultrafiltration into four fractions (MW <1, 1-3, 3-5, and >5 kDa).

The antioxidant and antihypertensive properties of the initial extract and the fractions were evaluated by in vitro assays for their ability to scavenge radical species, bind with metal ions, reduce ferric ions, and inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity.

The hydrolysate was strongly antioxidant and ACE-inhibiting; the most bioactive peptides were further concentrated by ultrafiltration. Of the 239 peptides identified, 47 (12 antioxidant and 35 ACE-inhibitory) exhibited structural features correlated with the specific bioactivity.

These results highlight the promise of hydrolysate and size-based HPB fractions as natural functional ingredients for the food or pharmaceutical industry.”

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34353019/

“In conclusion, this study highlights the potential use of HPB hydrolysate and fractions as multifunctional ingredients for the development of new healthy foods or for the pharmaceutical industry. ”

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jafc.1c01487

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Tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol as an oromucosal spray in a 1:1 ratio: a therapeutic option for patients with central post-stroke pain syndrome?

BMJ Journals - Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust“Central pain after stroke due to brainstem infarction is very rare. Treatment is difficult and specific guidelines are lacking. This is the report of a 61-year-old female patient who, after a posterolateral left medulla oblongata insult with incomplete Wallenberg syndrome, subsequently developed a burning and tingling pain in the contralateral leg and a burning and shooting pain in the ipsilateral face in trigeminal branches 1 and 2. More than 3 years of therapy with amitriptyline, gabapentin, pregabalin and various grade II and III opioids was ineffective or showed intolerable side effects. The administration of tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol as an oromucosal spray in a 1:1 ratio improved the pain situation and quality of life quickly and permanently. The encouraging results in the present case may suggest that treatment with medical cannabis should be considered in similar cases when standard therapies are insufficient.”

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34230048/

https://casereports.bmj.com/content/14/7/e243072

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Marijuana Use and the Risk of Early Ischemic Stroke: The Stroke Prevention in Young Adults Study

Stroke logo“Few studies have examined the dose-response and temporal relationships between marijuana use and ischemic stroke while controlling for important confounders, including the amount of tobacco smoking. The purpose of our study was to address these knowledge gaps.

Results: After adjusting for other risk factors, including the amount of current tobacco smoking, marijuana use was not associated with ischemic stroke, regardless of the timing of use in relationship to the stroke, including ever use, use within 30 days, and use within 24 hours.

Conclusions: These analyses do not demonstrate an association between marijuana use and an increased risk of early-onset ischemic stroke, although statistical power was limited for assessing the association among very heavy users.”

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34266309/

https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/STROKEAHA.120.032811

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Protective Effects of Cannabidivarin and Cannabigerol on Cells of the Blood-Brain Barrier Under Ischemic Conditions

View details for Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research cover image“Preclinical studies have shown cannabidiol is protective in models of ischemic stroke. Based on results from our recent systematic review, we investigated the effects of two promising neuroprotective phytocannabinoids, cannabigerol (CBG) and cannabidivarin (CBDV), on cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), namely human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), pericytes, and astrocytes.

Results: In astrocytes CBG and CBDV attenuated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), whereas CBDV (10 nM-10 μM) also decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion. CBDV (300 nM-10 μM) attenuated levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 in HBMECs. In astrocytes, CBG decreased levels of DNA damage proteins, including p53, whereas CBDV increased levels of DNA damage markers. Antagonists for CB1, CB2, PPAR-γ, PPAR-α, 5-HT1A, and TRPV1 had no effect on CBG (3 μM) or CBDV (1 μM)-mediated decreases in LDH in astrocytes. GPR55 and GPR18 were partially implicated in the effects of CBDV, but no molecular target was identified for CBG.

Conclusions: We show that CBG and CBDV were protective against OG mediated injury in three different cells that constitute the BBB, modulating different hallmarks of ischemic stroke pathophysiology. These data enhance our understanding of the protective effects of CBG and CBDV and warrant further investigation into these compounds in ischemic stroke. Future studies should identify other possible neuroprotective effects of CBG and CBDV and their corresponding mechanisms of action.”

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33998890/

“This study provides novel data on the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of CBG and CBDV in an in vitro model of IR. These data, together with evidence from other studies, corroborate the protective properties of these compounds and further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of action of CBG and CBDV and whether they can modulate BBB permeability in more clinically relevant in vivo models of ischemic stroke. There is lack of effective treatments for ischemic stroke, a condition that will increase in prevalence in coming years, to which cannabinoids may offer a unique therapeutic strategy.” 

https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/can.2020.0159

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A Cannabinoid Type 2 (CB2) Receptor Agonist Augments NOS-Dependent Responses of Cerebral Arterioles during Type 1 Diabetes

Microvascular Research “While activation of cannabinoid (CB2) receptors has been shown to be neuroprotective, no studies have examined whether this neuroprotection is directed at cerebral arterioles and no studies have examined whether activation of CB2 receptors can rescue cerebrovascular dysfunction during a chronic disease state such as type 1 diabetes (T1D).

Our goal was to test the hypothesis that administration of a CB2 agonist (JWH-133) would improve impaired endothelial (eNOS)- and neuronal (nNOS)- dependent dilation of cerebral arterioles during T1D.

In vivo diameter of cerebral arterioles in nondiabetic and T1D rats was measured in response to an eNOS-dependent agonist (adenosine 5′-diphosphate; ADP), an nNOS-dependent agonist (N-methyl-D-aspartate; NMDA), and an NOS-independent agonist (nitroglycerin) before and 1 hour following JWH-133 (1 mg/kg IP). Dilation of cerebral arterioles to ADP and NMDA was greater in nondiabetic than in T1D rats.

Treatment with JWH-133 increased responses of cerebral arterioles to ADP and NMDA in both nondiabetic and T1D rats. Responses of cerebral arterioles to nitroglycerin were similar between nondiabetic and T1D rats, and JWH-133 did not influence responses to nitroglycerin in either group. The restoration in responses to the agonists by JWH-133 could be inhibited by treatment with a specific inhibitor of CB2 receptors (AM-630; 3 mg/kg IP).

Thus, activation of CB2 receptors can potentiate reactivity of cerebral arterioles during physiologic and pathophysiologic states. We speculate that treatment with CB2 receptor agonists may have potential therapeutic benefits for the treatment of cerebral vascular diseases via a mechanism that can increase cerebral blood flow.”

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32979391/

“Activation of CB2 receptors improves cerebral vascular function. Activation of CB2 receptors improves responses in type 1 diabetes. We speculate that treatment with CB2 receptor agonists may have potential therapeutic benefits for the treatment of cerebral vascular disease that can contribute to the pathogenesis of stroke.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0026286220301370?via%3Dihub

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Association between recent cannabinoid use and acute ischemic stroke

Home“Studies that have analyzed the association between cannabis use and acute ischemic stroke (AIS) have provided conflicting results.

In this study, we aim to determine the association of recent cannabis use detected through urine drug screen (UDS) among patients admitted with AIS.

Results: A total of 9,350 patients were determined to have undergone UDS during admission, and 18% (1,643) of this had a positive urine cannabis test. Unadjusted risk ratio showed a 50% decrease in risk of AIS among cannabis users (risk ratio = 0.505, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.425-0.600). The effect was lost after adjusting for age, race, ethnicity, sickle cell disease, dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cigarette smoking, atrial fibrillation, and other cardiac conditions (odds ratio 1.038, 95% CI 0.773-1.394).

Conclusion: This is one of the few studies analyzing the association of recent cannabis use and AIS using admission urine toxicology test independent of polysubstance use. Although our study has limitations, we did not find an independent association between recent cannabis use and the incidence of AIS. Further studies using urine toxicology tests with larger sample size and including dosage of cannabis exposure should be conducted.”

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32983613/

https://cp.neurology.org/content/10/4/333

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Endocannabinoids and Stroke Prevention: Review of Clinical Studies.

View details for Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research cover image“The societal burden of ischemic stroke suggests a need for additional therapeutic categories in stroke prevention.

Modulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a rational target for stroke prevention because of its effects on inflammation, vascular tone, and metabolic balance, all well-described stroke risk factors.

In this article, we summarize the existing ECS clinical studies in human subjects’ research as they relate to conventional vascular risk factors associated with ischemic stroke.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32322672

https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/can.2018.0066

“The endocannabinoid system and stroke: A focused review. This review seeks to summarize the recent evidence for the role of the endocannabinoid signaling system in stroke pathophysiology, as well as the evidence from preclinical studies regarding the efficacy of cannabinoids as neuroprotective therapies in the treatment of stroke.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458776/

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Cannabis use and outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: A nationwide retrospective cohort study.

Journal of Clinical Neuroscience Home“Cannabis is the most consumed recreational drug in the world.

It is possible that cannabis has an association with an increased risk of vasospasm-related strokes and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), which are major causes of morbidity and mortality in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Hence, this study aimed to explore the independent relationship between cannabis use and outcomes after aSAH using the 2016 United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample.

RESULTS:

There were 42,394 patients identified with aSAH, of whom 925 were identified as cannabis users.

Cannabis users and non-users were similar in terms of severity of aSAH.

Although the unadjusted mortality rate was lower among cannabis users (16%) than non-users (22%), (p = 0.04), both the age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) (0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56; 1.24) and the multivariate-adjusted OR (0.87, 95% CI: 0.54; 1.42) did not reach statistical significance.

Secondary outcomes did not reach statistical significance.

CONCLUSION:

In this nationwide cohort, cannabis users with aSAH had similar outcomes compared to nonusers. However, these results are likely limited by underreporting of cannabis use. Future prospective studies are needed to elucidate the pathophysiology and association between cannabis and outcomes following aSAH.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31973920

https://www.jocn-journal.com/article/S0967-5868(19)31930-7/fulltext

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Cannabinoids and the expanded endocannabinoid system in neurological disorders.

 Related image“Anecdotal evidence that cannabis preparations have medical benefits together with the discovery of the psychotropic plant cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) initiated efforts to develop cannabinoid-based therapeutics.

These efforts have been marked by disappointment, especially in relation to the unwanted central effects that result from activation of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), which have limited the therapeutic use of drugs that activate or inactivate this receptor.

The discovery of CB2 and of endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligands (endocannabinoids) raised new possibilities for safe targeting of this endocannabinoid system. However, clinical success has been limited, complicated by the discovery of an expanded endocannabinoid system – known as the endocannabinoidome – that includes several mediators that are biochemically related to the endocannabinoids, and their receptors and metabolic enzymes.

The approvals of nabiximols, a mixture of THC and the non-psychotropic cannabinoid cannabidiol, for the treatment of spasticity and neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis, and of purified botanical cannabidiol for the treatment of otherwise untreatable forms of paediatric epilepsy, have brought the therapeutic use of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids in neurological diseases into the limelight.

In this Review, we provide an overview of the endocannabinoid system and the endocannabinoidome before discussing their involvement in and clinical relevance to a variety of neurological disorders, including Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, stroke, epilepsy and glioblastoma.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31831863

“The existence of the endocannabinoidome explains in part why some non-euphoric cannabinoids, which affect several endocannabinoidome proteins, are useful for the treatment of neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and epilepsy.”

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41582-019-0284-z

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The Endocannabinoid System and its Modulation by Cannabidiol (CBD).

Image result for Altern Ther Health Med. “The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is an extensive endogenous signaling system with multiple elements, the number of which may be increasing as scientists continue to elucidate its role in human health and disease. The ECS is seemingly ubiquitous in animal species and is modulated by diet, sleep, exercise, stress, and a multitude of other factors, including exposure to phytocannabinoids, like Cannabidiol (CBD). Modulating the activity of this system may offer tremendous therapeutic promise for a diverse scope of diseases, ranging from mental health disorders, neurological and movement disorders, pain, autoimmune disease, spinal cord injury, cancer, cardiometabolic disease, stroke, TBI, osteoporosis, and others.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31202198

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