Anti-Inflammatory Activity in Colon Models Is Derived from Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic Acid That Interacts with Additional Compounds in Cannabis Extracts.

“Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) include Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis. Cannabis sativa preparations have beneficial effects for IBD patients. However, C. sativa extracts contain hundreds of compounds. Although there is much knowledge of the activity of different cannabinoids and their receptor agonists or antagonists, the cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory activity of whole C. sativa extracts has never been characterized in detail with in vitro and ex vivo colon models.

Material and Methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of C. sativa extracts was studied on three lines of epithelial cells and on colon tissue. C. sativa flowers were extracted with ethanol, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine the level of interleukin-8 in colon cells and tissue biopsies, chemical analysis was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance and gene expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR.

Results: The anti-inflammatory activity of Cannabis extracts derives from D9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) present in fraction 7 (F7) of the extract. However, all fractions of C. sativa at a certain combination of concentrations have a significant increased cytotoxic activity. GPR55 receptor antagonist significantly reduces the anti-inflammatory activity of F7, whereas cannabinoid type 2 receptor antagonist significantly increases HCT116 cell proliferation. Also, cannabidiol (CBD) shows dose dependent cytotoxic activity, whereas anti-inflammatory activity was found only for the low concentration of CBD, and in a bell-shaped rather than dose-dependent manner. Activity of the extract and active fraction was verified on colon tissues taken from IBD patients, and was shown to suppress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) gene expression in both cell culture and colon tissue.

Conclusions: It is suggested that the anti-inflammatory activity of Cannabis extracts on colon epithelial cells derives from a fraction of the extract that contains THCA, and is mediated, at least partially, via GPR55 receptor. The cytotoxic activity of the C. sativa extract was increased by combining all fractions at a certain combination of concentrations and was partially affected by CB2 receptor antagonist that increased cell proliferation. It is suggested that in a nonpsychoactive treatment for IBD, THCA should be used rather than CBD.”

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Cannabidiol and Palmitoylethanolamide are anti-inflammatory in the acutely inflamed human colon.

Clinical Science “We sought to quantify the anti-inflammatory effects of two cannabinoid drugs: cannabidiol (CBD) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), in cultured cell lines and compared this effect with experimentally inflamed explant human colonic tissue.  These effects were explored in acutely and chronically inflamed colon, using inflammatory bowel disease and appendicitis explants.

Results:   IFNγ and TNFα treatment increased phosphoprotein and cytokine levels in Caco-2 cultures and colonic explants.  Phosphoprotein levels were significantly reduced by PEA or CBD in Caco-2 cultures and colonic explants.  CBD and PEA prevented increases in cytokine production in explant colon, but not in Caco-2 cells. CBD effects were blocked by the CB2antagonist AM630 and TRPV1 antagonist SB366791.  PEA effects were blocked by the PPARα antagonist GW6471.  PEA and CBD were anti-inflammatory in IBD and appendicitis explants.

Conclusion: PEA and CBD are anti-inflammatory in the human colon.  This effect is not seen in cultured epithelial cells. Appropriately sized clinical trials should assess their efficacy.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28954820

http://www.clinsci.org/content/early/2017/09/26/CS20171288

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Inhibition of Wnt/β-Catenin pathway and Histone acetyltransferase activity by Rimonabant: a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

 

“In a high percentage (≥85%) of both sporadic and familial adenomatous polyposis forms of colorectal cancer (CRC), the inactivation of the APC tumor suppressor gene initiates tumor formation and modulates the Wnt/β-Catenin transduction pathways involved in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and metastasis.

Increasing evidence showed that the endocannabinoids control tumor growth and progression, both in vitro and in vivo.

We evaluated the effect of Rimonabant, a Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) inverse agonist, on the Wnt/β-Catenin pathway in HCT116 and SW48 cell lines carrying the genetic profile of metastatic CRC poorly responsive to chemotherapies.

Obtained data heavily supported the rationale for the use of cannabinoids in combined therapies for metastatic CRC harbouring activating mutations of β-Catenin.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28916833

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-11688-x

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G protein-coupled receptor GPR55 promotes colorectal cancer and has opposing effects to cannabinoid receptor 1.

International Journal of Cancer

“The putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55 has been shown to play a tumor-promoting role in various cancers, and is involved in many physiological and pathological processes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

While the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 ) has been reported to suppress intestinal tumor growth, the role of GPR55 in the development of GI cancers is unclear. We, therefore, aimed at elucidating the role of GPR55 in colorectal cancer (CRC), the third most common cancer worldwide.

Collectively, our data suggest that GPR55 and CB1 play differential roles in colon carcinogenesis where the former seems to act as oncogene and the latter as tumor suppressor.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28875496

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.31030/abstract

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A Review of the Therapeutic Antitumor Potential of Cannabinoids.

:Image result for J Altern Complement Med.

“The aim of this review is to discuss cannabinoids from a preclinical and clinical oncological perspective and provide the audience with a concise, retrospective overview of the most significant findings concerning the potential use of cannabinoids in cancer treatment.

RESULTS:

Cannabis sativa is a plant rich in more than 100 types of cannabinoids. Besides exogenous plant cannabinoids, mammalian endocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoid analogues have been identified. Cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1) and type 2 (CB2) have been isolated and characterized from mammalian cells. Through cannabinoid receptor and non-receptor signaling pathways, cannabinoids show specific cytotoxicity against tumor cells, while protecting healthy tissue from apoptosis. The dual antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of cannabinoids and associated signaling pathways have been investigated on a large panel of cancer cell lines. Cannabinoids also display potent anticancer activity against tumor xenografts, including tumors that express high resistance to standard chemotherapeutics. Few studies have investigated the possible synergistic effects of cannabinoids with standard oncology therapies, and are based on the preclinically confirmed concept of “cannabinoid sensitizers.” Also, clinical trials aimed to confirm the antineoplastic activity of cannabinoids have only been evaluated on a small number of subjects, with no consensus conclusions regarding their effectiveness.

CONCLUSIONS:

A large number of cannabinoid compounds have been discovered, developed, and used to study the effects of cannabinoids on cancers in model systems. However, few clinical trials have been conducted on the use of cannabinoids in the treatment of cancers in humans. Further studies require extensive monitoring of the effects of cannabinoids alone or in combination with standard anticancer strategies. With such knowledge, cannabinoids could become a therapy of choice in contemporary oncology.”

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Cannabinoids as Modulators of Cell Death: Clinical Applications and Future Directions.

 Image result for Rev Physiol Biochem Pharmacol.

“Endocannabinoids are bioactive lipids that modulate various physiological processes through G-protein-coupled receptors (CB1 and CB2) and other putative targets. By sharing the activation of the same receptors, some phytocannabinoids and a multitude of synthetic cannabinoids mimic the effects of endocannabinoids.

In recent years, a growing interest has been dedicated to the study of cannabinoids properties for their analgesic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. In addition to these well-recognized effects, various studies suggest that cannabinoids may affect cell survival, cell proliferation or cell death. These observations indicate that cannabinoids may play an important role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis and, thus, may contribute to tissue remodelling and cancer treatment.

For a long time, the study of cannabinoid receptor signalling has been focused on the classical adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. However, this pathway does not totally explain the wide array of biological responses to cannabinoids. In addition, the diversity of receptors and signalling pathways that endocannabinoids modulate offers an interesting opportunity for the development of specific molecules to disturb selectively the endogenous system.

Moreover, emerging evidences suggest that cannabinoids ability to limit cell proliferation and to induce tumour-selective cell death may offer a novel strategy in cancer treatment.

This review describes the main properties of cannabinoids in cell death and attempts to clarify the different pathways triggered by these compounds that may help to understand the complexity of respective molecular mechanisms and explore the potential clinical benefit of cannabinoids use in cancer therapies.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28425013

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It’s Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Please Be Aware:

 Image result for cannabis colon cancer
 “Prevention and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer by Natural Agents From Mother Nature. This review clearly demonstrates that various nutraceuticals provided by the Mother Nature have a huge potential for both prevention and treatment of Colorectal cancer (CRC). Since these agents can be administered chronically without any concern for safety and are highly affordable, their use has been the wave of the past and is likely to continue as the wave of the future.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3693477/
“Links between inflammation and colon cancer metastasis” https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150825094923.htm
“Inflammation and colon cancer. The connection between inflammation and tumorigenesis is well-established. Inflammation is also likely to be involved with other forms of sporadic as well as heritable colon cancer.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20420949
“Cannabis-derived substances in cancer therapy–an emerging anti-inflammatory role for the cannabinoids. Chronic inflammation has been associated with neoplasia for sometime, and as a consequence, reducing inflammation as a way of impacting cancer presents a new role for these compounds. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20925645
“Cannabinoids as gastrointestinal anti-inflammatory drugs.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28239924
“Colon Cancer Risk Linked To High-Fat Diet: How Eating More Fat Can Increase Intestinal Tumors” http://www.medicaldaily.com/colon-cancer-high-fat-diet-intestinal-tumors-376664
 
“Study: Red and Processed Meats Linked With Colon Cancer Risk” http://healthland.time.com/2011/05/27/study-red-and-processed-meats-linked-with-colon-cancer-risk/
 
“Eating hot dogs, ham and other processed meat can cause colorectal cancer, and eating red meat “probably” can cause cancer, the World Health Organization’s cancer agency reported” http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2015/10/26/experts-processed-meats-can-cause-cancer/74615390/
 
“Mediterranean Diet Reduces Risk of Colon Cancer”
 
 
“More evidence a veg diet might lower cancer risk” http://www.today.com/health/veggie-diet-lowers-colon-cancer-risk-t7671
 
 
 
“Omegas linked with colon cancer survival. A large, observational study has linked higher intake of omega-3s with a lower risk of dying from colon cancer.” http://www.newhope.com/breaking-news/omegas-linked-colon-cancer-survival
 “Study shows how high-fat diets increase colon cancer risk” http://news.temple.edu/news/2012-03-06/study-shows-how-high-fat-diets-increase-colon-cancer-risk
“Poor metabolic health linked to increased risk for colorectal cancer in normal-weight women” http://www.news-medical.net/news/20170201/Poor-metabolic-health-linked-to-increased-risk-for-colorectal-cancer-in-normal-weight-women.aspx
 
“Cheese, Milk, and Fatty Fish Can Help Fight Colon Cancer” https://munchies.vice.com/en_us/article/cheese-milk-and-fatty-fish-can-help-fight-colon-cancer
“Diet, exercise and aspirin: 3 tools to fight colon cancer” http://ktar.com/story/1314810/diet-exercise-aspirin-3-tools-fight-colon-cancer/
“Many Early Colon Cancers Linked to Inherited Genes” https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162574.html
“E.coli Bacteria Linked to Colon Cancer” http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/e-coli-bateria-linked-colon-cancer-375102
 
“Colorectal cancer prevalence linked to human papillomavirus: a systematic review with meta-analysis” http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S1415-790X2016000400791&script=sci_arttext&tlng=en
“Colon cancer linked to viruses in beef, Nobel-winning scientist contends” http://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/health/article/1695757/colon-cancer-linked-viruses-beef-nobel-winning-scientist-contends
 
“Diet High in Choline Linked with Increased Risk of Colorectal Polyps. According to the results of a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, high intake of choline-a nutrient found in foods such as red meat, eggs, poultry, and dairy products-may be linked with an increased risk of colorectal polyps.” http://news.cancerconnect.com/diet-high-in-choline-linked-with-increased-risk-of-colorectal-polyps/
“High-Glycemic Foods Linked to Colon Cancer. These foods include breads, pastas, pancakes, and other carbohydrates made from refined “white” grains, as well as other processed or sugary foods such as cakes, cookies, and other snacks.” http://www.webmd.com/colorectal-cancer/news/20040203/high-glycemic-foods-linked-to-colon-cancer#1
 
“Low-carb diet cuts risk of colon cancer” https://www.utoronto.ca/news/low-carb-diet-cuts-risk-colon-cancer
 
“Common food additive promotes colon cancer in mice. Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter intestinal bacteria in a manner that promotes intestinal inflammation and colorectal cancer” https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161107110639.htm
“Processed meats including bacon, hot dogs linked to colon cancer” http://www.cp24.com/news/processed-meats-including-bacon-hot-dogs-linked-to-colon-cancer-1.2627498
“Processed meat can cause colon cancer, World Health Organization says” http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/meat-cancer-world-health-organization-1.3288355
 
“Sweets, sugary snacks linked to colorectal cancer” http://www.cbsnews.com/news/sweets-sugary-snacks-linked-to-colorectal-cancer/
“Eating Nuts Linked to Lower Risk of Colon Cancer” http://www.livescience.com/54448-eating-nuts-may-lower-colon-cancer-risk.html
 
“Coffee consumption linked to lower risk of colorectal cancer” http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coffee-consumption-linked-to-lower-risk-of-colorectal-cancer-1.2841834
“Alcohol Linked to Colorectal Cancer Risk” http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/749886
“Excessive alcohol consumption favours high risk polyp or colorectal cancer occurrence among patients with adenomas: a case control study” http://gut.bmj.com/content/50/1/38.full
 
“High vitamin D levels linked to lower risk of colon cancer” http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_22-1-2010-13-46-0
 
“Anthocyanins in Purple, Blue and Red Foods Fight Colon Cancer” http://reliawire.com/anthocyanins-purple-blue-red-foods-fight-colon-cancer/
 
“Prunes reduce colon cancer risk by benefiting healthy gut bacteria” http://www.belmarrahealth.com/prunes-reduce-colon-cancer-risk-by-benefiting-healthy-gut-bacteria/
“BLACK RASPBERRIES A POTENTIALLY POWERFUL AGENT IN FIGHT AGAINST COLON CANCER” https://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/brberry.htm
 
 
 
 
 
“G‐protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55), a lysophospholipid receptor, has been shown to play an important role in carcinogenesis. GPR55 is involved in the migratory behaviour of colon carcinoma cells and may serve as a pharmacological target for the prevention of metastasis.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4688947/
“The putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55 promotes cancer cell proliferation.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21057532
 “L-α-lysophosphatidylinositol meets GPR55: a deadly relationship. Evidence points to a role of L-α-lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) in cancer.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21367464
“Modulation of l-α-Lysophosphatidylinositol/GPR55 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Signaling by Cannabinoids*Here, we report that the little investigated cannabis constituents CBDV, CBGA, and CBGV are potent inhibitors of LPI-induced GPR55 signaling. The phytocannabinoids Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin, cannabidivarin, and cannabigerovarin are also potent inhibitors of LPI. Our findings also suggest that GPR55 may be a new pharmacological target for the following C. sativa constituents: Δ9-THCV, CBDV, CBGA, and CBGV. These Cannabis sativa constituents may represent novel therapeutics targeting GPR55.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3249141/
 “Cannabinoids and cancer: potential for colorectal cancer therapy.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16042581
 “The endogenous cannabinoid system protects against colonic inflammation”  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC385396/
 “Cannabinoids in intestinal inflammation and cancer. In vivo, cannabinoids – via direct or indirect activation of CB(1) and/or CB(2) receptors – exert protective effects in well-established models of intestinal inflammation and colon cancer. Pharmacological elevation of endocannabinoid levels may be a promising strategy to counteract intestinal inflammation and colon cancer.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19442536
 “Cannabinoids have become a novel therapeutic approach against colon cancer with protective and anti-tumoral effects on colorectal carcinoma cell lines and in animal models of colon cancer” http://impactjournals.com/oncoscience/index.php?pii=119 
 “Possible endocannabinoid control of colorectal cancer growth. Inhibitors of endocannabinoid inactivation may prove useful anticancer agents.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12949714
“Increased endocannabinoid levels reduce the development of precancerous lesions in the mouse colon. Cannabinoids have been licensed for clinical use as palliative treatment of chemotherapy, but increasing evidence shows antitumor actions of cannabinoid agonists on several tumor cells in vitro and in animal models” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2755791/

“Loss of cannabinoid receptor 1 accelerates intestinal tumor growth”  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2561258/

“Turned-off Cannabinoid Receptor Turns On Colorectal Tumor Growth” https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080801074056.htm

“Turning CB1 back on and then treating with a cannabinoid agonist could provide a new approach to colorectal cancer treatment or prevention. Cannabinoids are a group of ligands that serve a variety of cell-signaling roles. Some are produced by the body internally (endocannabinoids). External cannabinoids include manmade versions and those present in plants, most famously the active ingredient in marijuana (THC).” http://www.news-medical.net/news/2008/08/03/40485.aspx

“Cannabinoid Receptor Activation Induces Apoptosis through Tumor Necrosis Factor α–Mediated Ceramide De novo Synthesis in Colon Cancer Cells. The present study shows that either CB1 or CB2 receptor activation induces apoptosis through ceramide de novo synthesis in colon cancer cells. ” http://clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/14/23/7691.long

“The cannabinoid delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits RAS-MAPK and PI3K-AKT survival signalling and induces BAD-mediated apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. Here, we report that CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human colorectal adenoma and carcinoma cells, and show for the first time that THC induces apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. The use of THC, or selective targeting of the CB1 receptor, may represent a novel strategy for colorectal cancer therapy.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17583570

“Programmed Cell Death (Apoptosis)” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK26873/

“Cannabis-Linked Cell Receptor Might Help Prevent Colon Cancer” http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=91511

“Chemopreventive effect of the non-psychotropic phytocannabinoid cannabidiol on experimental colon cancer. Cannabidiol, a safe and non-psychotropic ingredient of Cannabis sativa, exerts pharmacological actions (antioxidant and intestinal antinflammatory) and mechanisms (inhibition of endocannabinoid enzymatic degradation) potentially beneficial for colon carcinogenesis. It is concluded that cannabidiol exerts chemopreventive effect in vivo and reduces cell proliferation through multiple mechanisms.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22231745

“CBD-Rich Marijuana Fights Colon Cancer, New Study Finds” http://blog.sfgate.com/smellthetruth/2014/01/06/cbd-rich-marijuana-fights-colon-cancer-new-study-finds/

“Inhibition of colon carcinogenesis by a standardized Cannabis sativa extract with high content of cannabidiol. Cannabis-based medicines are useful adjunctive treatments in cancer patients.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24373545

“Cannabigerol (CBG) is a safe non-psychotropic Cannabis-derived cannabinoid. CBG hampers colon cancer progression in vivo and selectively inhibits the growth of colorectal cancer cells. CBG should be considered translationally in colorectal cancer prevention and cure.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25269802

“According to researchers at the University of Texas in Houston chemicals in marijuana could be a potential cure in the treatment of colon cancer.” http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/258161

“Cannabis compound clue to colon cancer”  https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg19926685.000-cannabis-compound-clue-to-colon-cancer/

“Marijuana takes on colon cancer” https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn14451-marijuana-takes-on-colon-cancer/

“Cannabinoids appear to kill tumor cells but do not affect their nontransformed counterparts and may even protect them from cell death. Tumor specimens revealed that THC had antiangiogenic and antiproliferative effects. CBD has also been demonstrated to exert a chemopreventive effect in a mouse model of colon cancer. In in vitro experiments involving colorectal cancer cell lines, the investigators found that CBD protected DNA from oxidative damage, increased endocannabinoid levels, and reduced cell proliferation. In addition, both plant-derived and endogenous cannabinoids have been studied for anti-inflammatory effects. A mouse study demonstrated that endogenous cannabinoid system signaling is likely to provide intrinsic protection against colonic inflammation. As a result, a hypothesis that phytocannabinoids and endocannabinoids may be useful in the risk reduction and treatment of colorectal cancer has been developed.” http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/hp/cannabis-pdq#section/_7

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Dietary ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Inhibit Tumor Growth in Transgenic ApcMin/+ Mice, Correlating with CB1 Receptor Up-Regulation.

Image result for international journal of molecular sciences

“Mediterranean diet components, such as olive oil and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs), can arrest cell growth and promote cell apoptosis.

Recently, olive oil has been demonstrated to modulate type-1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor gene expression in both human colon cancer cells and rat colon. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible link between olive oil and ω-3 PUFAs effects and CB1 receptor expression in both intestinal and adipose tissue of ApcMin/+ mice.

To confirm the role for the CB1 receptor as a negative modulator of cell proliferation in human colon cancer, CB1 receptor gene expression was also detected in tumor tissue and in surrounding normal mucosa of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC).

Dietary ω-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited intestinal polyp growth in mice, correlating with CB1 receptor gene and protein expression induction. CB1 receptor gene up-regulation was also detected in adipose tissue, suggesting a close communication between cancer cells and the surrounding environment. Tissue CB1 receptor induction was associated with a concurrent inactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

Moreover, there was a significant reduction in CB1 receptor gene expression levels in cancer tissue compared to normal surrounding mucosa of patients with CRC, confirming that in cancer the “protective” action of the CB1 receptor is lost.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28245562

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Pharmacological inhibition of MAGL lipase attenuates experimental colon carcinogenesis.

Image result for pharmacological research

“Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health problem in Western countries. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) exerts antiproliferative actions in a number of tumoral cell lines, including CRC cells.

Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), a serine hydrolase that inactivates 2-AG, is highly expressed in aggressive human cancer cells.

Here, we investigated the role of MAGL in experimental colon carcinogenesis.

MAGL, possibly through modulation of angiogenesis, plays a pivotal role in experimental colon carcinogenesis.

Pharmacological inhibition of MAGL could represent an innovative therapeutic approach to reduce colorectal tumor progression.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28193521

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The gastrointestinal tract – a central organ of cannabinoid signaling in health and disease

Image result for Neurogastroenterol Motil.

“In ancient medicine, extracts of the marijuana plant Cannabis sativa were used against diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

Today, our knowledge of the ingredients of the Cannabis plant has remarkably advanced enabling us to use a variety of herbal and synthetic cannabinoid (CB) compounds to study the endocannabinoid system (ECS), a physiologic entity that controls tissue homeostasis with the help of endogenously produced CBs and their receptors.

After many anecdotal reports suggested beneficial effects of Cannabis in GI disorders, it was not surprising to discover that the GI tract accommodates and expresses all the components of the ECS.

The following review summarizes important and recent findings on the role of CB receptors and their ligands in the GI tract with emphasis on GI disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and colon cancer.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27561826

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