Muscular Dystrophy-Cannabinoids-Symptom Relief

“Cannabinoids Help Muscular Dystrophy Symptoms: Cannabinoids are now known to have the capacity for neuromodulation, via direct, receptor-based mechanisms, at numerous levels within the nervous system. 

These provide therapeutic properties that may be applicable to the treatment of neurological disorders, including anti-oxidative, neuroprotective effects, analgesia, anti-inflammatory actions, immunomodulation, modulation of glial cells and tumor growth regulation. 

Beyond that, the cannabinoids have also been shown to be “remarkably safe with no potential for overdose.”

(vaporizing) Marijuana:

“miraculously improved his quality of life so much so that he left his family and friends in New Jersey to live in California, where he can readily get his medication.”

Sublingual (under the tongue)-tincture (alcohol based) or infused oil (olive or food grade glycerin or coconut)

Topicals (salves, ointments, balms) for muscle pain and spasms.

Cannabinoids:  increase appetite, analgesic (rid pain), muscle relaxant, saliva reduction, bronchodialation,  and sleep induction.

 

CBD-rich strains are best choice.  Sativa dominant x Indica.”

More: http://medicalmarijuana.com/medical-marijuana-treatments/MD

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Medical Marijuana use for Muscular Dystrophy

“Since he can’t use his arms Michael Oliveri’s mother Christiane assists him when drinking his green tea. Michael Oliveri, 25, is in a wheel chair due to muscular dystrophy.”

Medical Marijuana use for Muscular Dystrophy 

“After trying numerous medications in search for relief from tremendous pain, he tried medical marijuana, which he says miraculously improved his quality of life so much so that he left his family and friends in New Jersey to live in California, where his meds is legal and accessible.”
 
 
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Medical Marijuana Patient Clayton Holton Tells His Story.

“Clayton Holton uses marijuana to help fight Muscular Dystrophy. Help convince the New Hampshire legislature protect patients like Clayton!”

 

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQS3KEGtdBI

“Clayton Holton, 27, suffers from Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a genetic disorder characterized by degeneration of muscle tissue. This illness manifested itself in early childhood and robbed him of his ability to walk at age 10.  Clayton knows DMD will eventually claim his life, so the purpose of treatment is to keep him alive and help him enjoy a decent quality of life for as long as possible.

Clayton first experienced serious painkillers at age 16 when his wheelchair was struck by a car. The doctors gave him Vicodin. “I blacked out for a day and a half, and I don’t remember any of it,” he explained.

Soon after the wheelchair accident, Clayton tried marijuana as a substitute for Vicodin. The effects were entirely positive. Clayton was able to dramatically reduce his intake of painkillers, and as an added bonus, he found that marijuana took the edge off his anxiety and depression, stimulated his appetite, and helped him maintain a healthier weight.

In December, 2007, Clayton weighed less than 80 pounds.  He was living in a rest home and forced to use Oxycontin rather than marijuana to treat his pain.  Fortunately, in 2008 Clayton was able to visit California for an extended period of time; while there, he had access to high quality marijuana grown for medical use.  As a result, Clayton gained 8 pounds in a few months’ time and was able to stop relying on many of his prescription drugs.

Now that Clayton is back in his home state of New Hampshire, he is forced to use whatever marijuana he is able to procure via the black market.  To make matters worse, the government of his state considers him a common criminal for trying to treat his pain and stimulate his appetite.  He must choose between risking arrest and jail or relieving his suffering. If arrested, Clayton could face up to a year in jail simply for possessing the medicine that helps him live.”

More: http://nhcompassion.org/clayton_holton

“Sign this Petition to Help Medical Cannabis Patients. Here’s the petition, and here are Clayton’s own words on why you should sign it:

Because my weight is down to 63 pounds, and there are many other patients like me who can’t afford to wait.

As a 28-year-old battling muscular dystrophy, I’ve been fighting for my life since I lost my ability to walk at age 13.

I know from personal experience that medical marijuana works for me, having spent a summer in California several years ago. In the months that I was able to use it legally, I gained more than 10 pounds and was able to stop taking prescription pain medicines altogether. There is no cure for my condition, but medical marijuana relieves my pain and stimulates my appetite, dramatically improving my quality of life when I’m able to use it.

I have been asking New Hampshire legislators to allow patients like me to use medical marijuana for nearly a decade, and it finally appears that a medical marijuana bill is going to pass this year. Unfortunately, it appears this law may not be of any benefit to patients like me who are fighting for our lives.

HB 573, which passed overwhelmingly with over 80% support in the House, allows patients to access medical marijuana from one of five state-regulated alternative treatment centers or grow up to three cannabis plants for their own use. The House version of the bill also includes an affirmative defense that patients could raise in court so that they won’t be thrown in jail during the 19 months it will take for the health department to begin issuing ID cards.

The home grow option and full affirmative defense are very important because a patient or caregiver would be able to start growing this summer rather than waiting until at least 2015 for legal protections and access. Sadly, bowing to pressure from the police chiefs’ association, Gov. Maggie Hassan has now insisted that home cultivation be removed from the bill, meaning that patients will have no choice but to buy marijuana from criminals. Her administration also requested changes gutting the affirmative defense so that patients would have no legal protections at all until ID cards are available in late 2014 or early 2015.

This means patients will continue to suffer without legal access to marijuana and with no legal protections. Frankly, I do not expect to live another two years, so for me, this may as well be a death sentence.

Patients in Maine, Vermont, and lots of other states are allowed to cultivate their own plants, and many states have provided protections for patients while regulations are being crafted. Patients like me are NOT criminals, and we should be free to grow our own medicine in the “Live Free or Die” state. Please sign our petition and tell Gov. Hassan patients can’t afford to wait!

Additionally, please call her office at 603-271-2121 and let her know how you feel about this!”

More: http://freekeene.com/2013/05/24/sign-this-petition-to-help-medical-cannabis-patients/ 

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The endocannabinoid system and its therapeutic exploitation.

“The term ‘endocannabinoid’ – originally coined in the mid-1990s after the discovery of membrane receptors for the psychoactive principle in Cannabis, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and their endogenous ligands – now indicates a whole signalling system that comprises cannabinoid receptors, endogenous ligands and enzymes for ligand biosynthesis and inactivation.

 This system seems to be involved in an ever-increasing number of pathological conditions. With novel products already being aimed at the pharmaceutical market little more than a decade since the discovery of cannabinoid receptors, the endocannabinoid system seems to hold even more promise for the future development of therapeutic drugs.

 We explore the conditions under which the potential of targeting the endocannabinoid system might be realized in the years to come.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15340387

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Cannabinoids and Cannabis Cure: the healing abilities of cannabinoids found in medical cannabis

“Cannabinoids and Cannabis Cure: Documentary”

marijuana cannabis research doctors cannabinoids

“Cannabis and cannabinoids documentary video that shows several aspects of the healing abilities of medical cannabis and the endocannabinoid system.

Several medical marijuana videos together to provide over an hour of information on cannabinoids and their many functions in human health and medicine.”

http://www.knowmarijuana.com/2013/02/28/cannabis-cannabinoids-cure/

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xh2qd_foV-4

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From cannabis to the endocannabinoid system: refocussing attention on potential clinical benefits.

Abstract

“Cannabis sativa is one of the oldest herbal remedies known to man. Over the past four thousand years, it has been used for the treatment of numerous diseases but due to its psychoactive properties, its current medicinal usage is highly restricted. In this review, we seek to highlight advances made over the last forty years in the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the effects of cannabis on the human body and how these can potentially be utilized in clinical practice. During this time, the primary active ingredients in cannabis have been isolated, specific cannabinoid receptors have been discovered and at least five endogenous cannabinoid neurotransmitters (endocannabinoids) have been identified. Together, these form the framework of a complex endocannabinoid signalling system that has widespread distribution in the body and plays a role in regulating numerous physiological processes within the body. Cannabinoid ligands are therefore thought to display considerable therapeutic potential and the drive to develop compounds that can be targeted to specific neuronal systems at low enough doses so as to eliminate cognitive side effects remains the ‘holy grail’ of endocannabinoid research.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23155985

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Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities.

“Human tissues express cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors that can be activated by endogenously released ‘endocannabinoids’ or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy.

Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)) and Sativex (Δ(9)-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex).

This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders.

It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive ‘multi-targeting’.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23108552

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Therapeutic aspects of cannabis and cannabinoids

“HISTORY OF THERAPEUTIC USE

The first formal report of cannabis as a medicine appeared in China nearly 5000 years ago when it was recommended for malaria, constipation, rheumatic pains and childbirth and, mixed with wine, as a surgical analgesic. There are subsequent records of its use throughout Asia, the Middle East, Southern Africa and South America. Accounts by Pliny, Dioscorides and Galen remained influential in European medicine for 16 centuries.”

“It was not until the 19th century that cannabis became a mainstream medicine in Britain. W. B. O’Shaughnessy, an Irish scientist and physician, observed its use in India as an analgesic, anticonvulsant, anti-spasmodic, anti-emetic and hypnotic. After toxicity experiments on goats and dogs, he gave it to patients and was impressed with its muscle-relaxant, anticonvulsant and analgesic properties, and recorded its use-fulness as an anti-emetic.”

“After these observations were published in 1842, medicinal use of cannabis expanded rapidly. It soon became available ‘over the counter’ in pharmacies and by 1854 it had found its way into the United States Dispensatory. The American market became flooded with dozens of cannabis-containing home remedies.”

“Cannabis was outlawed in 1928 by ratification of the 1925 Geneva Convention on the manufacture, sale and movement of dangerous drugs. Prescription remained possible until final prohibition under the 1971 Misuse of Drugs Act, against the advice of the Advisory Committee on Drug Dependence.”

“In the USA, medical use was effectively ruled out by the Marijuana Tax Act 1937. This ruling has been under almost constant legal challenge and many special dispensations were made between 1976 and 1992 for individuals to receive ‘compassionate reefers’. Although this loophole has been closed, a 1996 California state law permits cultivation or consumption of cannabis for medical purposes, if a doctor provides a written endorsement. Similar arrangements apply in Italy and Canberra, Australia.”

“Results and Conclusions Cannabis and some cannabinoids are effective anti-emetics and analgesics and reduce intra-ocular pressure. There is evidence of symptom relief and improved well-being in selected neurological conditions, AIDS and certain cancers. Cannabinoids may reduce anxiety and improve sleep. Anticonvulsant activity requires clarification. Other properties identified by basic research await evaluation. Standard treatments for many relevant disorders are unsatisfactory. Cannabis is safe in overdose but often produces unwanted effects, typically sedation, intoxication, clumsiness, dizziness, dry mouth, lowered blood pressure or increased heart rate. The discovery of specific receptors and natural ligands may lead to drug developments. Research is needed to optimise dose and route of administration, quantify therapeutic and adverse effects, and examine interactions.”

http://bjp.rcpsych.org/content/178/2/107.long

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The therapeutic potential of novel cannabinoid receptors.

“Cannabinoids produce a plethora of biological effects, including the modulation of neuronal activity through the activation of CB(1) receptors and of immune responses through the activation of CB(2) receptors. The selective targeting of either of these two receptor subtypes has clear therapeutic value.

Recent evidence indicates that some of the cannabinomimetic effects previously thought to be produced through CB(1) and/or CB(2) receptors, be they on neuronal activity, on the vasculature tone or immune responses, still persist despite the pharmacological blockade or genetic ablation of CB(1) and/or CB(2) receptors. This suggests that additional cannabinoid and cannabinoid-like receptors exist.

Here we will review this evidence in the context of their therapeutic value and discuss their true belonging to the endocannabinoid signaling system.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19248809

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