The ameliorative effect of hemp seed hexane extracts on the Propionibacterium acnes-induced inflammation and lipogenesis in sebocytes.

“In this study, we investigated the anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-lipogenic effects of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) seed hexane extracts, focusing on the Propionibacterium acnes-triggered inflammation and lipogenesis.

Hemp seed hexane extracts (HSHE) showed anti-microbial activity against P. acnes.

The expression of iNOS, COX-2, and the subsequent production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin increased after infection of P. acnes in HaCaT cells, however, upon treating with HSHE, their expressions were reduced. P. acnes-induced expressions of IL-1β and IL-8 were also reduced.

HSHE exerted anti-inflammatory effects by regulating NF-κB and MAPKs signaling and blunting the translocation of p-NF-κB to the nucleus in P. acnes-stimulated HaCaT cells. Moreover, P. acnes-induced phosphorylation of ERK and JNK, and their downstream targets c-Fos and c-Jun, was also inhibited by HSHE. In addition, the transactivation of AP-1 induced by P. acnes infection was also downregulated by HSHE.

Notably, HSHE regulated inflammation and lipid biosynthesis via regulating AMPK and AKT/FoxO1 signaling in IGF-1-induced inflammation and lipogenesis of sebocytes. In addition, HSHE inhibited 5-lipoxygenase level and P. acnes-induced MMP-9 activity, and promoted collagen biosynthesis in vitro.

Thus, HSHE could be utilized to treat acne vulgaris, through its anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-lipogenic, and collagen-promoting properties.”

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Cannabinoids in dermatology: a scoping review.

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“The therapeutic applications of cannabis and cannabinoids are an increasingly conspicuous topic as de-criminalization and legalization of these products continues to expand.

A limited number of cannabinoid compounds have been approved for a specific set of conditions. However, the current role of cannabinoids for the treatment of dermatologic conditions remains to be defined.

We conducted a review of the current literature to determine the applications of cannabinoids for the therapy of various skin diseases.

After conducting our analysis, we found that cannabinoid products have the potential to treat a variety of skin conditions, including acne vulgaris, allergic contact dermatitis, asteatotic dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, hidradenitis suppurativa, Kaposi sarcoma, pruritus, psoriasis, skin cancer, and the cutaneous manifestations of systemic sclerosis. However, the majority of available data on these compounds are pre-clinical and there is a corresponding lack of high-quality randomized, controlled trials that evaluate their effects.

Cannabinoids have shown some initial promise as therapy for a variety of skin diseases. However, there is a requirement for thorough pre-clinical research and large-scale, randomized, controlled trials before cannabinoids can be considered safe and effective treatments for these conditions.”

“The endocannabinoid system of the skin. A potential approach for the treatment of skin disorders”  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0006295218303484

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The endocannabinoid system of the skin. A potential approach for the treatment of skin disorders.

Biochemical Pharmacology

“The skin is the largest organ of the body and has a complex and very active structure that contributes to homeostasis and provides the first line defense against injury and infection.

In the past few years it has become evident that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) plays a relevant role in healthy and diseased skin.

Specifically, we review how the dysregulation of ECS has been associated to dermatological disorders such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, scleroderma and skin cancer. Therefore, the druggability of the ECS could open new research avenues for the treatment of the pathologies mentioned.

Numerous studies have reported that phytocannabinoids and their biological analogues modulate a complex network pharmacology involved in the modulation of ECS, focusing on classical cannabinoid receptors, transient receptor potential channels (TRPs), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs).

The combined targeting of several end-points seems critical to provide better chances of therapeutically success, in sharp contrast to the one-disease-one-target dogma that permeates current drug discovery campaigns.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30138623

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0006295218303484

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Endocannabinoid tone regulates human sebocyte biology.

JID home

“We have previously shown that i) endocannabinoids (eCB; e.g. anandamide [AEA]) are involved in the maintenance of homeostatic sebaceous lipid production (SLP) in human sebaceous glands (SG); and ii) eCB treatment dramatically increases SLP. Here, we aimed to investigate the expression of the major eCB synthesizing and degrading enzymes, and to study the effects of eCB uptake inhibitors on human SZ95 sebocytes, thus exploring the role of the putative eCB membrane transporter (EMT), which has been hypothesized to facilitate the cellular uptake and subsequent degradation of eCBs. We found that the major eCB synthesizing (NAPE-PLD, DAGLα and -β) and degrading (FAAH, MAGL) enzymes are expressed in SZ95 sebocytes, and also in SGs (except for DAGLα, whose staining was dubious in histological preparations). Interestingly, eCB uptake-inhibition with VDM11 induced a moderate increase in SLP, and also elevated the levels of various eCBs and related acylethanolamides. Finally, we found that VDM11 was able to interfere with the pro-inflammatory action of the Toll-like receptor 4 activator lipopolysaccharide. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of eCB uptake exerts anti-inflammatory actions and elevates both SLP and eCB levels; thus, these inhibitors might be beneficial in cutaneous inflammatory conditions accompanied by dry skin.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29501385

http://www.jidonline.org/article/S0022-202X(18)30147-7/pdf

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The Risks and Benefits of Cannabis in the Dermatology Clinic.

SAGE Journals

“Cannabis ( Cannabis sativa/indica), also known as marijuana, has been used for medicinal and recreational purposes for millennia.

There has been a recent trend to legalize the use of cannabis, as illustrated by the recent legalization votes in numerous states in the United States and legislation in Canada to allow recreational cannabis use. With this increasing consumption of cannabis, dermatologists will see increased pressure to prescribe cannabis and will see the side effects of cannabis use with greater frequency.

There are several approved medical indications for cannabis use, including psoriasis, lupus, nail-patella syndrome, and severe pain. In addition, very preliminary studies have suggested cannabis and its derivatives might have use in acne, dermatitis, pruritus, wound healing, and skin cancer.

In this review, we summarize some of the studies and reports regarding the medicinal uses of cannabis in the dermatology clinic and some of the side effects that might present more often to dermatologists as the use of cannabis increases.”

“Cannabinoid system in the skin – a possible target for future therapies in dermatology.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19664006

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Topical cannabinoids in dermatology.

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“Topical cannabinoids are increasingly utilized by dermatology patients for a range of disorders; however, the acceptance of these over-the-counter products has far outpaced scientific investigation into their safety and efficacy. Here, we review the studies of topical cannabinoids in skin conditions and assess their current place in dermatology practice.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28873100

“The endocannabinoid system of the skin in health and disease: novel perspectives and therapeutic opportunities” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2757311/

“Cannabinoid system in the skin – a possible target for future therapies in dermatology.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19664006

“Anti-inflammatory cannabinoids for skin diseases”  https://www.endoca.com/blog/discovery/anti-inflammatory-cannabinoids-skin-diseases/

“Topical cannabinoids may help to treat skin diseases”  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/316968.php

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The role of cannabinoids in dermatology

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“Twenty-eight states currently allow for comprehensive public medical cannabis programs, and this number continues to grow.  Approximately 1 in 10 adult cannabis users in the United States use it for medical purposes. Numerous studies have investigated its uses for chronic pain, spasticity, anorexia, and nausea. In recent years, researchers have also investigated its use for the treatment of dermatologic conditions including pruritus, inflammatory skin disease, and skin cancer.”

http://www.jaad.org/article/S0190-9622(17)30308-0/abstract

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The Endocannabinoid System and Its Role in Eczematous Dermatoses.

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“The skin serves as the foremost barrier between the internal body and the external world, providing crucial protection against pathogens and chemical, mechanical, and ultraviolet damages. The skin is a central player in the intricate network of immune, neurologic, and endocrine systems. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) includes an extensive network of bioactive lipid mediators and their receptors, functions to modulate appetite, pain, mood, and memory, and has recently been implicated in skin homeostasis. Disruption of ECS homeostasis is implicated in the pathogenesis of several prevalent skin conditions. In this review, we highlight the role of endocannabinoids in maintaining skin health and homeostasis and discuss evidence on the role of ECS in several eczematous dermatoses including atopic dermatitis, asteatotic eczema, irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, and chronic pruritus. The compilation of evidence may spark directions for future investigations on how the ECS may be a therapeutic target for dermatologic conditions.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28098721

“The endocannabinoid system of the skin in health and disease: novel perspectives and therapeutic opportunities.”  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2757311/

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Targeting Cutaneous Cannabinoid Signaling in Inflammation – A “High”-way to Heal?

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“The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a recently emerging complex regulator of multiple physiological processes. It comprises several endogenous ligands (e.g. N-arachidonoylethanolamine, a.k.a. anandamide [AEA], 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG], palmitoylethanolamide [PEA], etc.), a number of endocannabinoid (eCB)-responsive receptors (e.g. CB1 and CB2, etc.), as well as enzymes and transporters involved in the synthesis and degradation of the eCBs.

Among many other tissues and organs, various members of the ECS were shown to be expressed in the skin as well. Indeed, AEA, 2-AG, CB1 and CB2 together with the major eCB-metabolizing enzymes (e.g. fatty acid amide hydrolase [FAAH], which cleaves AEA to ethanolamine and pro-inflammatory arachidonic acid) were found in various cutaneous cell types. Importantly, the eCB-tone and cannabinoid signaling in general appear to play a key role in regulating several fundamental aspects of cutaneous homeostasis, including proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes, hair growth, sebaceous lipid production, melanogenesis, fibroblast activity, etc.

Moreover, appropriate eCB-signaling through CB1 and CB2 receptors was found to be crucially important in keeping cutaneous inflammatory processes under control.

Collectively, these findings (together with many other recently published data) implied keratinocytes to be “non-classical” immune competent cells, playing a central role in initiation and regulation of cutaneous immune processes, and the “c(ut)annabinoid” system is now proven to be one of their master regulators.

Another recently emerging, fascinating possibility to manage cutaneous inflammation through the cannabinoid signaling is the administration of phytocannabinoids (pCB). Cannabis sativa contains over 100 different pCBs, the vast majority of which have no psychotropic activity, and usually possess a “favorable” side-effect profile, which makes these substances particularly interesting drug candidates in treating several inflammation-accompanied diseases.

With respect to the skin, we have recently shown that one of the best studied pCBs, (−)-cannabidiol (CBD), may have great potential in managing acne, an inflammation-accompanied, extremely prevalent cutaneous disease.

Collectively, in light of the above results, both increase/restoration of the homeostatic cutaneous eCB-tone by FAAH-inhibitors and topical administration of non-psychotropic pCBs hold out the promise to exert remarkable anti-inflammatory actions, making them very exciting drug candidates, deserving full clinical exploration as potent, yet safe novel class of anti-inflammatory agents.”

http://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(17)30003-8/fulltext

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Anandamide Suppresses Proinflammatory T Cell Responses In Vitro through Type-1 Cannabinoid Receptor-Mediated mTOR Inhibition in Human Keratinocytes.

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“The endocannabinoid system comprises cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and metabolic enzymes of these ligands.

The endocannabinoid system has recently been implicated in the regulation of various pathophysiological processes of the skin that include immune competence and/or tolerance of keratinocytes, the disruption of which might promote the development of skin diseases.

Recent evidence showed that CB1 in keratinocytes limits the secretion of proinflammatory chemokines, suggesting that this receptor might also regulate T cell dependent inflammatory diseases of the skin.

In this article, we sought to investigate the cytokine profile of IFN-γ-activated keratinocytes, and found that CB1 activation by AEA suppressed production and release of signature TH1- and TH17-polarizing cytokines, IL-12 and IL-23, respectively. We also set up cocultures between a conditioned medium of treated keratinocytes and naive T cells to disclose the molecular details that regulate the activation of highly proinflammatory TH1 and TH17 cells.

AEA-treated keratinocytes showed reduced an induction of IFN-γ-producing TH1 and IL-17-producing TH17 cells, and these effects were reverted by pharmacological inhibition of CB1.

Further analyses identified mammalian target of rapamycin as a proinflammatory signaling pathway regulated by CB1, able to promote either IL-12 and IL-23 release from keratinocytes or TH1 and TH17 polarization.

Taken together, these findings demonstrate that AEA suppresses highly pathogenic T cell subsets through CB1-mediated mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition in human keratinocytes.

Thus, it can be speculated that the latter pathway might be beneficial to the physiological function of the skin, and can be targeted toward inflammation-related skin diseases.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27694494

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