Systemic Injections of Cannabidiol Enhance Acetylcholine Levels from Basal Forebrain in Rats.

Neurochemical Research

Cannabis sativa is a plant that contains more than 500 components, of which the most studied are Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). Several studies have indicated that CBD displays neurobiological effects, including wake promotion.

Moreover, experimental evidence has shown that injections of CBD enhance wake-related compounds, such as monoamines (dopamine, serotonin, epinephrine, and norepinephrine). However, no clear evidence is available regarding the effects of CBD on additional wake-related neurochemicals such as acetylcholine (ACh).

Here, we demonstrate that systemic injections of CBD (0, 5, 10 or 30 mg/kg, i.p.) at the beginning of the lights-on period, increase the extracellular levels of ACh collected from the basal forebrain and measured by microdialysis and HPLC means. Moreover, the time course effects on the contents of ACh were present 5 h post-injection of CBD.

Altogether, these data demonstrate that CBD increases ACh levels in a brain region related to wake control. This study is the first to show the effects of ACh levels in CBD-treated rats and suggests that the basal forebrain might be a site of action of CBD for wakefulness modulation.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29876791

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Therapeutic Symptomatic Strategies in the Parasomnias.

Current Treatment Options in Neurology

“The purpose of this review was to discuss the currently available pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment options for parasomnias.

Cannabinoids proved to be effective in some of parasomnias, as in many other neurological disorders.

Prazosin and cannabinoids are effective in nightmare disorder.”

“Parasomnias are a category of sleep disorders that involve abnormal movements, behaviors, emotions, perceptions, and dreams that occur while falling asleep, sleeping, between sleep stages, or during arousal from sleep.”  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parasomnia
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Pharmacotherapy of Apnea by Cannabimimetic Enhancement, the PACE Clinical Trial: Effects of Dronabinol in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

Oxford University Press

“There remains an important and unmet need for fully effective and acceptable treatments in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). At present, there are no approved drug treatments. Dronabinol has shown promise for OSA pharmacotherapy in a small dose-escalation pilot study.

Here, we present initial findings of the Phase II PACE (Pharmacotherapy of Apnea by Cannabimimetic Enhancement) trial, a fully-blinded parallel groups, placebo-controlled randomized trial of dronabinol in patients with moderate or severe OSA.

These findings support the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in patients with OSA. In comparison to placebo, dronabinol was associated with lower AHI, improved subjective sleepiness and greater overall treatment satisfaction. Larger scale clinical trials will be necessary to clarify the best potential approach(es) to cannabinoid therapy in OSA”   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29121334

“These findings support the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).” https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsx184/4600041?redirectedFrom=fulltext

Cannabinoid May Be First Drug for Sleep Apnea” https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/891821
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Effects of Cannabinoid Agonists and Antagonists on Sleep and Breathing in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

Issue Cover

“There are no pharmacological treatments for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, but dronabinol showed promise in a small pilot study. In anesthetized rats, dronabinol attenuates reflex apnea via activation of cannabinoid (CB) receptors located on vagal afferents; an effect blocked by cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and/or type 2 (CB2) receptor antagonists. Here, using a natural model of central sleep apnea, we examine the effects of dronabinol, alone and in combination with selective antagonists in conscious rats chronically instrumented to stage sleep and measure cessation of breathing.

RESULTS:

Dronabinol decreased the percent time spent in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. CB receptor antagonists did not reverse this effect. Dronabinol also decreased apneas during sleep, and this apnea suppression was reversed by CB1 or CB1/CB2 receptor antagonism.

CONCLUSIONS:

Dronabinol’s effects on apneas were dependent on CB1 receptor activation, while dronabinol’s effects on REM sleep were CB receptor-independent.”

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The endocannabinoid system modulating levels of consciousness, emotions and likely dream contents.

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“Cannabinoids are derivatives that are either compounds occurring naturally in the plant, Cannabis sativa or synthetic analogs of these molecules. The first and most widely investigated of the cannabinoids is ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), which is the main psychotropic constituent of cannabis and undergoes significant binding to cannabinoid receptors.

These cannabinoid receptors are seven-transmembrane receptors that received their name from the fact that they respond to cannabinoid compounds, including Δ9-THC. The cannabinoid receptors have been described in rat, human and mouse brains and they have been named as the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors.

Later, an endogenous molecule that exerts pharmacological effects similar to those described by ∆9-THC and binds to the cannabinoid receptors was discovered. This molecule, named anandamide, was the first of five endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists described to date in the mammalian brain and other tissues. Of these endogenous cannabinoids or endocannabinoids, the most thoroughly investigated to date have been anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG).

Over the years, a significant number of articles have been published in the field of endogenous cannabinoids, suggesting a modulatory profile in multiple neurobiological roles of endocannabinoids. The general consensus accepts that the endogenous cannabinoid system includes natural ligands (such as anandamide and 2-AG), receptors (CB1 and CB2), and the main enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of anandamide and 2-AG (fatty acid amide hydrolase [FAAH] and monoacylglycerol lipase [MAGL], respectively) as well as the anandamide membrane transporter (AMT).

To date, diverse pieces of evidence have shown that the endocannabinoid system controls multiple functions such as feeding, pain, learning and memory and has been linked with various diseases, such as Parkinson´s disease. Among the modulatory properties of the endocannabinoid system, current data indicate that the sleep-wake cycle is under the influence of endocannabinoids since the blocking of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor or the pharmacological inhibition of FAAH activity promotes wakefulness whereas the obstruction of AMT function enhances sleep. However, no solid evidence is available regarding the role of the endocannabinoid system in an unquestionable emotional component of the sleep: Dream activity.

Since dreaming is a mental activity that occurs during sleep (characterized by emotions, sensory perceptions, and bizarre components) and the endocannabinoid system modulates neurobiological processes involving consciousness, such as learning and memory, attention, pain perception, emotions and sleep, it is acceptable to hypothesize that the endocannabinoid system might be modulating dream activity. In this regard, an accumulative body of evidence in human and animal models has been reported regarding the role of the endocannabinoid system in the control of emotional states and dreams.

Moreover, preliminary studies in humans have indicated that treatment with cannabinoids may decrease post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, including nightmares. Thus, based on a review of the literature available in PubMed, this article hypothesizes a conceptual framework within which the endocannabinoid system might influence the generation of dream experiences.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28240187

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Revealing the role of the endocannabinoid system modulators, SR141716A, URB597 and VDM-11, in sleep homeostasis.

 

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“The endocannabinoid system comprises receptors (CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors), enzymes (Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase [FAAH], which synthesizes the endocannabinoid anandamide), as well as the anandamide membrane transporter (AMT).

Importantly, previous experiments have demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system modulates multiple neurobiological functions, including sleep.

For instance, SR141716A (the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist) as well as URB597 (the FAAH inhibitor) increase waking in rats whereas VDM-11 (the blocker of the AMT) enhances sleep in rodents. However, no further evidence is available regarding the neurobiological role of the endocannabinoid system in the homeostatic control of sleep.

Therefore, the aim of the current experiment was to test if SR141716A, URB597 or VDM-11 would modulate the sleep rebound after sleep deprivation. Thus, these compounds were systemically injected (5, 10, 20mg/Kg; ip; separately each one) to rats after prolonged waking. We found that SR141716A and URB597 blocked in dose-dependent fashion the sleep rebound whereas animals treated with VDM-11 displayed sleep rebound during the recovery period.

Complementary, injection after sleep deprivation of either SR141716A or URB597 enhanced dose-dependently the extracellular levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, serotonin, as well as adenosine while VDM-11 caused a decline in contents of these molecules.

These findings suggest that SR141716A or URB597 behave as a potent stimulants since they suppressed the sleep recovery period after prolonged waking.

It can be concluded that elements of the endocannabinoid system, such as the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, FAAH and AMT, modulate the sleep homeostasis after prolonged waking.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27746343

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ENDOCANNABINOID SYSTEM: A multi-facet therapeutic target.

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“Cannabis sativa is also popularly known as marijuana. It is being cultivated and used by man for recreational and medicinal purposes from many centuries.

Study of cannabinoids was at bay for very long time and its therapeutic value could not be adequately harnessed due to its legal status as proscribed drug in most of the countries.

The research of drugs acting on endocannabinoid system has seen many ups and down in recent past. Presently, it is known that endocannabinoids has role in pathology of many disorders and they also serve “protective role” in many medical conditions.

Several diseases like emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, anorexia, epilepsy, glaucoma, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, metabolic syndrome related diseases, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and Tourette’s syndrome could possibly be treated by drugs modulating endocannabinoid system.

Presently, cannabinoid receptor agonists like nabilone and dronabinol are used for reducing the chemotherapy induced vomiting. Sativex (cannabidiol and THC combination) is approved in the UK, Spain and New Zealand to treat spasticity due to multiple sclerosis. In US it is under investigation for cancer pain, another drug Epidiolex (cannabidiol) is also under investigation in US for childhood seizures. Rimonabant, CB1 receptor antagonist appeared as a promising anti-obesity drug during clinical trials but it also exhibited remarkable psychiatric side effect profile. Due to which the US Food and Drug Administration did not approve Rimonabant in US. It sale was also suspended across the EU in 2008.

Recent discontinuation of clinical trial related to FAAH inhibitor due to occurrence of serious adverse events in the participating subjects could be discouraging for the research fraternity. Despite of some mishaps in clinical trials related to drugs acting on endocannabinoid system, still lot of research is being carried out to explore and establish the therapeutic targets for both cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists.

One challenge is to develop drugs that target only cannabinoid receptors in a particular tissue and another is to invent drugs that acts selectively on cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood brain barrier. Besides this, development of the suitable dosage forms with maximum efficacy and minimum adverse effects is also warranted.

Another angle to be introspected for therapeutic abilities of this group of drugs is non-CB1 and non-CB2 receptor targets for cannabinoids.

In order to successfully exploit the therapeutic potential of endocannabinoid system, it is imperative to further characterize the endocannabinoid system in terms of identification of the exact cellular location of cannabinoid receptors and their role as “protective” and “disease inducing substance”, time-dependent changes in the expression of cannabinoid receptors.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27086601

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Endocannabinoid Signaling Regulates Sleep Stability.

“Since antiquity cannabinoids have been used as a treatment for insomnia, and the first reports in western medical literature regarding the therapeutic utility and physiological effects of cannabis preparations note their hypnogenic properties.

The hypnogenic properties of cannabis have been recognized for centuries, but endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) regulation of vigilance states is poorly characterized.

We report findings from a series of experiments in mice measuring sleep with polysomnography after various systemic pharmacological manipulations of the endocannabinoid system.

Our findings demonstrate that eCB signaling is necessary and sufficient for the control of sleep stability, but this neurotransmitter system is not necessary for sleep homeostasis.

 These results support the hypothesis that endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 is necessary for NREM stability but it is not necessary for sleep homeostasis.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4816426/

http://www.thctotalhealthcare.com/category/insomnia/

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NEW SLEEP APNEA PILL DERIVED FROM CANNABIS

ABC7 Los Angeles

“Sleep apnea, a condition affecting more than 12 million Americans, can lead to a host of health problems, including heart disease, and a new treatment containing ingredients derived from cannabis is being developed to help those with the disorder.”

http://abc7.com/health/new-sleep-apnea-pill-derived-from-cannabis/1141400/

http://www.thctotalhealthcare.com/category/sleep-apnea/

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Cannabinoid Type 1 and Type 2 Receptor Antagonists Prevent Attenuation of Serotonin-Induced Reflex Apneas by Dronabinol in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

“The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in Americans is 9% and increasing…

Vagal afferent neurons are inhibited by cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) or cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptors in animal models of vagally-mediated behaviors…

These findings underscore the therapeutic potential of dronabinol (THC) in the treatment of OSA and implicate participation of both cannabinoid receptors in dronabinol’s apnea suppression effect.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25350456

http://www.thctotalhealthcare.com/category/sleep-apnea/

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