[Cannabidiol: its use in refractory epilepsies].

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“Some epileptic syndromes are characterised by seizures that are difficult to control and are associated to delayed neuropsychomotor development, which results in a deterioration in the patient’s quality of life as well as in that of his or her family.

AIM:

To evaluate the use of cannabidiol as adjuvant therapy in patients with refractory epilepsies.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

An observational study was conducted by means of a survey addressed to the patient’s caregiver. Data collected included information about the patient and the caregiver, changes observed in the seizures, neuropsychological effects, side effects and the family’s overall perception following the use of cannabidiol.

RESULTS:

The evaluation examined 15 patients with refractory epilepsies, who received cannabidiol over a period ranging from one month to one year. The frequency of seizures decreased in 40% of the patients, 60% of the patients were seen to have control over 50% of their seizures and in 27% of them the seizures disappeared completely. Neurocognitive changes were also reported: behaviour improved in 73%; 60% reported an improvement in language; in 50% sleep improved; 43% reported improvements in eating habits; and 100% said their mood had improved. The overall perception of the illness was that there had been improvements in 73% of respondents. The most common side effects were drowsiness and fatigue.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest a possible beneficial effect of cannabidiol on the control of seizures and on the improvement of certain neurocognitive aspects in patients with refractory epilepsies.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28726233

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Antinociceptive effects of HUF-101, a fluorinated cannabidiol derivative.

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“Cannabidiol (CBD) is a phytocannabinoid with multiple pharmacological effects and several potential therapeutic properties. Its low oral bioavailability, however, can limit its clinical use.

Preliminary results indicate that fluorination of the CBD molecule increases its pharmacological potency. Here, we investigated whether HUF-101 (3, 10, and 30mg/kg), a fluorinated CBD analogue, would induce antinociceptive effects.

These findings show that HUF-101 produced antinociceptive effects at lower doses than CBD, indicating that the addition of fluoride improved its pharmacological profile. Furthermore, some of the antinociceptive effects of CBD and HUF-101 effects seem to involve the activation of CB1 and CB2 receptors.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28720466

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278584617302233

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A Conversion of Oral Cannabidiol to Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Seems Not to Occur in Humans

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“Cannabidiol (CBD), a major cannabinoid of hemp, does not bind to CB1 receptors and is therefore devoid of psychotomimetic properties. Under acidic conditions, CBD can be transformed to delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids. It has been argued that this may occur also after oral administration in humans. However, the experimental conversion of CBD to THC and delta8-THC in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) is a highly artificial approach that deviates significantly from physiological conditions in the stomach; therefore, SGF does not allow an extrapolation to in vivo conditions.

Unsurprisingly, the conversion of oral CBD to THC and its metabolites has not been observed to occur in vivo, even after high doses of oral CBD. In addition, the typical spectrum of side effects of THC, or of the very similar synthetic cannabinoid nabilone, as listed in the official Summary of Product Characteristics (e.g., dizziness, euphoria/high, thinking abnormal/concentration difficulties, nausea, tachycardia) has not been observed after treatment with CBD in double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trials. In conclusion, the conversion of CBD to THC in SGF seems to be an in vitro artifact.

Over 40 years of research on CBD does not suggest a conversion of CBD to delta9-THC and/or other cannabinoids in vivo after oral administration. Such transformation occurs under artificial conditions, but is without any relevance for an oral therapy with CBD.”  http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/can.2017.0009?_ga=2.206725530.884504339.1500032065-2115951543.1500032065#

“Cannabidiol Does Not Convert to THC In Vivo. Although CBD Can Be Transformed to THC Under Acidic Conditions, the Conversion of Oral CBD Doesn’t Occur In Vivo” http://www.genengnews.com/gen-exclusives/cannabidiol-does-not-convert-to-thc-iin-vivoi/77900938

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An Overview on Medicinal Chemistry of Synthetic and Natural Derivatives of Cannabidiol.

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“Cannabidiol (CBD) has been traditionally used in Cannabis-based preparation, however historically, it has received far less interest as a single drug than the other components of Cannabis. Currently, CBD generates considerable interest due to its beneficial neuroprotective, antiepileptic, anxiolytic, antipsychotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, the CBD scaffold becomes of increasing interest for medicinal chemists. This review provides an overview of the chemical structure of natural and synthetic CBD derivatives including the molecular targets associated with these compounds. A clear identification of their biological targets has been shown to be still very challenging.”  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28701957

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Cannabidiol Is a Potential Therapeutic for the Affective-Motivational Dimension of Incision Pain in Rats.

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“Drugs that interfere with the endocannabinoid system are alternatives for the management of clinical pain. Cannabidiol (CBD), a phytocannabinoid found in Cannabis sativa, has been utilized in preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of pain. Herein, we evaluate the effects of CBD. The study provides evidence that CBD influences different dimensions of the response of rats to a surgical incision, and the results establish the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) as a brain area from which CBD evokes antinociceptive effects in a manner similar to the systemic administration of CBD. The present study has shown for the first time that CBD injected either systemically or into the rACC induces a long-lasting anti-allodynic effect with a bell-shaped dose-response curve in a rat model of incision pain.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28680401
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Cannabinoids as therapeutic for PTSD

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“Limited efficacy for current pharmacotherapy for PTSD indicates that improved pharmacological treatments are needed. Neurobiological research points to cannabinoids as possible therapeutic agents of interest. Moreover, observational reports indicate that there is growing popular interest in therapeutic use of cannabinoids for the alleviation of trauma symptoms. The aim of this review was to present an up-to-date look at current research on the possible therapeutic value of cannabinoids for PTSD. Experimental, preclinical, and clinical findings are discussed.

Highlights

Neurobiological research indicates cannabis as possible pharmacological intervention for PTSD.

CBD and THC + CBD modulate fear memory in rodents.

Experimental data suggest CBD has acute anti-depressive and anxiolytic effects.

Data suggest THC reduces nightmares and OSA, while THC + CBD could reduce insomnia.

Randomized placebo-controlled human trials of cannabinoids for PTSD are underway.”

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352250X16302342

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/311949481_Cannabinoids_as_therapeutic_for_PTSD

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Cannabinoids in Pediatrics.

“Despite its controversial nature, the use of medical marijuana and cannabis-derived medicinal products grows more popular with each passing year. As of November 2016, over 40 states have passed legislation regarding the use of either medical marijuana or cannabidiol products. Many providers have started encountering patients experimenting with cannabis products for a wide range of conditions. While the debate continues regarding these agents for both medicinal and recreational use in the general population, special consideration needs to be made for pediatric use. This review will deliver the history of marijuana use and legislation in the United States in addition to the currently available medical literature to equip pediatric health care providers with resources to provide patients and their parents the best recommendation for safe and appropriate use of cannabis-containing compounds.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28638299     http://www.jppt.org/doi/10.5863/1551-6776-22.3.176?code=ppag-site

“Report of a parent survey of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis use in pediatric treatment-resistant epilepsy.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24237632

“The legal status of cannabis (marijuana) and cannabidiol (CBD) under U.S. law.”  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28169144

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Assessing the role of serotonergic receptors in cannabidiol’s anticonvulsant efficacy.

“Cannabidiol (CBD) is a phytocannabinoid that has demonstrated anticonvulsant efficacy in several animal models of seizure. The current experiment validated CBD’s anticonvulsant effect using the acute pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) model.

While this work further confirms the anticonvulsant efficacy of CBD and supports its application in the treatment of human seizure disorders, additional research on CBD’s mechanism of action must be conducted.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28624721

http://www.epilepsybehavior.com/article/S1525-5050(17)30122-1/fulltext

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Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy in pediatric patients enrolled in a prospective, open-label clinical study with cannabidiol.

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“Recent clinical trials indicate that cannabidiol (CBD) may reduce seizure frequency in pediatric patients with certain forms of treatment-resistant epilepsy. Many of these patients experience significant impairments in quality of life (QOL) in physical, mental, and social dimensions of health. In this study, we measured the caregiver-reported Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) in a subset of patients enrolled in a prospective, open-label clinical study of CBD. Results from caregivers of 48 patients indicated an 8.2 ± 9.9-point improvement in overall patient QOLCE (p < 0.001) following 12 weeks of CBD. Subscores with improvement included energy/fatigue, memory, control/helplessness, other cognitive functions, social interactions, behavior, and global QOL. These differences were not correlated to changes in seizure frequency or adverse events. The results suggest that CBD may have beneficial effects on patient QOL, distinct from its seizure-reducing effects; however, further studies in placebo-controlled, double-blind trials are necessary to confirm this finding.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28617940

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/epi.13815/abstract

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A single dose of cannabidiol reduces blood pressure in healthy volunteers in a randomized crossover study.

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“Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychoactive phytocannabinoid used in multiple sclerosis and intractable epilepsies. Preclinical studies show CBD has numerous cardiovascular benefits, including a reduced blood pressure (BP) response to stress. The aim of this study was to investigate if CBD reduces BP in humans.

CONCLUSIONS:

This data shows that acute administration of CBD reduces resting BP and the BP increase to stress in humans, associated with increased HR. These hemodynamic changes should be considered for people taking CBD. Further research is required to establish whether CBD has a role in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28614793

https://insight.jci.org/articles/view/93760

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