The potential role of cannabinoids in dermatology.

 Publication Cover“Cannabis is increasingly being used world-wide to treat a variety of dermatological conditions. Medicinal cannabis is currently legalized in Canada, 31 states in America and 19 countries in Europe. The authors reviewed the literature on the pharmacology and use of cannabinoids in treating a variety of skin conditions including acne, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, skin cancer, pruritus, and pain. Cannabinoids have demonstrated anti-inflammatory, antipruritic, anti-ageing, and antimalignancy properties by various mechanisms including interacting with the newly found endocannabinoid system of the skin thereby providing a promising alternative to traditional treatments.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31599175

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09546634.2019.1675854?journalCode=ijdt20

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Cannabidiol induces antioxidant pathways in keratinocytes by targeting BACH1.

Redox Biology“Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major non-psychotropic phytocannabinoid that attracted a great attention for its therapeutic potential against different pathologies including skin diseases.

However, although the efficacy in preclinical models and the clinical benefits of CBD in humans have been extensively demonstrated, the molecular mechanism(s) and targets responsible for these effects are as yet unknown.

Herein we characterized at the molecular level the effects of CBD on primary human keratinocytes using a combination of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical mass spectrometry (SWATH-MS).

Functional analysis revealed that CBD regulated pathways involved in keratinocyte differentiation, skin development and epidermal cell differentiation among other processes. In addition, CBD induced the expression of several NRF2 target genes, with heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) being the gene and the protein most upregulated by CBD. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, RNA interference and biochemical studies demonstrated that the induction of HMOX1 mediated by CBD, involved nuclear export and proteasomal degradation of the transcriptional repressor BACH1.

Notably, we showed that the effect of BACH1 on HMOX1 expression in keratinocytes is independent of NRF2. In vivo studies showed that topical CBD increased the levels of HMOX1 and of the proliferation and wound-repair associated keratins 16 and 17 in the skin of mice.

Altogether, our study identifies BACH1 as a molecular target for CBD in keratinocytes and sets the basis for the use of topical CBD for the treatment of different skin diseases including atopic dermatitis and keratin disorders.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31518892

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213231719306470?via%3Dihub

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Bronchodilator effect of delta1-tetrahydrocannabinol.

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“1 delta1-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol, (delta1-THC) produces bronchodilatation in asthmatic patients. 2 Administered in 62 microliter metered volumes containing 50–200 microgram by inhalation from an aerosol device to patients judged to be in a steady state, it increased peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). 3 The rate of onset, magnitude, and duration of the bronchodilator effect was dose related.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/656294

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1429361/

“Bronchodilator effect of delta1-tetrahydrocannabinol administered by aerosol of asthmatic patients. The mode of action of THC differs from that of sympathomimetic drugs, and it or a derivative may make a suitable adjuvant in the treatment of selected asthmatics.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/797044

“Bronchodilators are medications that open (dilate) the airways (bronchial tubes) of the lung by relaxing bronchial muscles and allow people who have difficulty breathing to breath better. Bronchodilators are used for treating:

https://www.medicinenet.com/bronchodilators_for_asthma/article.htm

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Cannabidiol reduces airway inflammation and fibrosis in experimental allergic asthma.

European Journal of Pharmacology

“Asthma is characterized by chronic lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Asthma remains a major public health problem and, at present, there are no effective interventions capable of reversing airway remodelling.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is known to exert immunomodulatory effects through the activation of cannabinoid-1 and -2 (CB1 and CB2) receptors located in the central nervous system and immune cells, respectively. However, as the role of CBD on airway remodelling and the mechanisms of CB1 and CB2 aren’t fully elucidated, this study was designed to evaluate the effects of cannabidiol in this scenario.

Allergic asthma was induced in Balb/c mice exposed to ovalbumin, and respiratory mechanics, collagen fibre content in airway and alveolar septa, cytokine levels, and CB1 and CB2 expression were determined. Moreover, expressions of CB1 and CB2 in induced sputum of asthmatic individuals and their correlation with airway inflammation and lung function were also evaluated.

CBD treatment, regardless of dosage, decreased airway hyperresponsiveness, whereas static lung elastance only reduced with high dose. These outcomes were accompanied by decreases in collagen fibre content in both airway and alveolar septa and the expression of markers associated with inflammation in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung homogenate. There was a significant and inverse correlation between CB1levels and lung function in asthmatic patients.

CBD treatment decreased the inflammatory and remodelling processes in the model of allergic asthma. The mechanisms of action appear to be mediated by CB1/CB2 signalling, but these receptors may act differently on lung inflammation and remodelling.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30481497

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014299918306836?via%3Dihub

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Cannabinoids in dermatology: a scoping review.

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“The therapeutic applications of cannabis and cannabinoids are an increasingly conspicuous topic as de-criminalization and legalization of these products continues to expand.

A limited number of cannabinoid compounds have been approved for a specific set of conditions. However, the current role of cannabinoids for the treatment of dermatologic conditions remains to be defined.

We conducted a review of the current literature to determine the applications of cannabinoids for the therapy of various skin diseases.

After conducting our analysis, we found that cannabinoid products have the potential to treat a variety of skin conditions, including acne vulgaris, allergic contact dermatitis, asteatotic dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, hidradenitis suppurativa, Kaposi sarcoma, pruritus, psoriasis, skin cancer, and the cutaneous manifestations of systemic sclerosis. However, the majority of available data on these compounds are pre-clinical and there is a corresponding lack of high-quality randomized, controlled trials that evaluate their effects.

Cannabinoids have shown some initial promise as therapy for a variety of skin diseases. However, there is a requirement for thorough pre-clinical research and large-scale, randomized, controlled trials before cannabinoids can be considered safe and effective treatments for these conditions.”

“The endocannabinoid system of the skin. A potential approach for the treatment of skin disorders”  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0006295218303484

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Anti-inflammatory properties of cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic cannabinoid, in experimental allergic contact dermatitis.

Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

“Phytocannabinoids modulate inflammatory responses by regulating the production of cytokines in several experimental models of inflammation.

Cannabinoid type-2 (CB2) receptor activation was shown to reduce the production of the monocyte chemotactic protein-2 (MCP-2) chemokine in polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly-(I:C)]-stimulated human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells, an in vitro model of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD).

We investigated if non-psychotropic cannabinoids like cannabidiol (CBD) produced similar effects in this experimental model of ACD.

This is the first demonstration of the anti-inflammatory properties of CBD in an experimental model of ACD.”

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Involvement of spinal cannabinoid receptors in the antipruritic effects of WIN 55,212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist.

Clinical and Experimental Dermatology

“Cannabinoids have been used for their analgesic and euphoric effects for millennia, but recently the antipruritic effects of cannabis have been discovered.

Considering the similarities between pain and itch sensations, we hypothesized that cannabinoid receptors may play a role in the antipruritic effects of cannabinoids.

Our findings support prior researches indicating that cannabinoids exert antipruritic effects. Moreover, our results show that the antipruritic effects of cannabinoids are partially mediated by spinal CB1 receptors.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29424035

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ced.13398/abstract

“antipruritic: 1. Preventing or relieving itching. 2. An agent that relieves itching.”   https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/antipruritic

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CB2 receptors regulate natural killer cells that limit allergic airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma.

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“Allergic asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disease involving the complementary actions of innate and adaptive immune responses.

Endogenously generated cannabinoids, acting via CB2 receptors play important roles in both homeostatic and inflammatory processes. However, the contribution of CB2-acting eicosanoids to the innate events preceding sensitization to the common house dust mite (HDM) allergen, remain to be elucidated. We investigated the role of CB2 activation during allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation and NK cell effector function.

CONCLUSIONS:

Collectively, these results reveal that CB2 activation is crucial in regulating pulmonary NK cell function, and suggest that NK cells serve to limit ILC2 activation and subsequent allergic airway inflammation. CB2 inhibition may present an important target to modulate NK cell response during pulmonary inflammation.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27992060

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Descending serotonergic and noradrenergic systems do not regulate the antipruritic effects of cannabinoids.

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“For centuries, cannabinoids have been known to be effective in pain states. Itch and pain are two sensations sharing a lot in common.

OBJECTIVE:

The goal of this research was to observe whether the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 reduces serotonin-induced scratching behaviour and whether neurotoxic destruction of descending serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways mediate the antipruritic effect of WIN 55,212-2.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings indicate that cannabinoids dose-dependently reduce serotonin-induced scratching behaviour and neurotoxic destruction of descending inhibitory pathways does not mediate this antipruritic effect.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27805543

 

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Palmitoylethanolamide reduces inflammation and itch in a mouse model of contact allergic dermatitis.

Image result for Eur J Pharmacol.

“In mice, 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) induces contact allergic dermatitis (CAD), which, in a late phase, is characterized by mast cell (MC) infiltration and angiogenesis.

Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), an endogenous anti-inflammatory molecule, acts by down-modulating MCs following activation of the cannabinoid CB2 receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α).

We have previously reported the anti-inflammatory effect of PEA in the early stage of CAD.

Here, we examined whether PEA reduces the features of the late stage of CAD including MC activation, angiogenesis and itching.

PEA, by reducing the features of late stage CAD in mice, may be beneficial in this pathological condition.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27720681

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