Involvement of spinal cannabinoid receptors in the antipruritic effects of WIN 55,212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist.

Clinical and Experimental Dermatology

“Cannabinoids have been used for their analgesic and euphoric effects for millennia, but recently the antipruritic effects of cannabis have been discovered.

Considering the similarities between pain and itch sensations, we hypothesized that cannabinoid receptors may play a role in the antipruritic effects of cannabinoids.

Our findings support prior researches indicating that cannabinoids exert antipruritic effects. Moreover, our results show that the antipruritic effects of cannabinoids are partially mediated by spinal CB1 receptors.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29424035

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ced.13398/abstract

“antipruritic: 1. Preventing or relieving itching. 2. An agent that relieves itching.”   https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/antipruritic

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Descending serotonergic and noradrenergic systems do not regulate the antipruritic effects of cannabinoids.

Image result for Acta Neuropsychiatrica

“For centuries, cannabinoids have been known to be effective in pain states. Itch and pain are two sensations sharing a lot in common.

OBJECTIVE:

The goal of this research was to observe whether the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 reduces serotonin-induced scratching behaviour and whether neurotoxic destruction of descending serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways mediate the antipruritic effect of WIN 55,212-2.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings indicate that cannabinoids dose-dependently reduce serotonin-induced scratching behaviour and neurotoxic destruction of descending inhibitory pathways does not mediate this antipruritic effect.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27805543

 

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous