Activation of Cannabinoid Receptors Attenuates Endothelin-1-induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Rat Ventricular Myocytes.

Image result for Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology.“Evidence suggests that activation of the endocannabinoid system offers cardioprotection.

Aberrant energy production by impaired mitochondria purportedly contributes to various aspects of cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether cannabinoid (CB) receptor activation would attenuate mitochondrial dysfunction induced by endothelin-1 (ET1).

Acute exposure to ET1 (4 h) in the presence of palmitate as primary energy substrate induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and decreased mitochondrial bioenergetics and expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation (i.e. peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator (PGC)-1α, a driver of mitochondrial biogenesis, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)-1β, facilitator of fatty acid uptake).

A CB1/CB2 dual agonist with limited brain penetration, CB-13, corrected these parameters. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important regulator of energy homeostasis, mediated the ability of CB-13 to rescue mitochondrial function. In fact, the ability of CB-13 to rescue fatty acid oxidation-related bioenergetics, as well as expression of PGC-1α and CPT-1β, was abolished by pharmacological inhibition of AMPK using compound C and shRNA knockdown of AMPKα1/α2, respectively.

Interventions that target CB/AMPK signaling might represent a novel therapeutic approach to address the multi-factorial problem of cardiovascular disease.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31815823

https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00005344-900000000-98463

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The Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist WIN55,212-2 Ameliorates Hippocampal Neuronal Damage After Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Possibly Through Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and ASK1-p38 Signaling.

 “Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is a major contributor to cognitive decline and degenerative processes leading to Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, and aging. However, the delicate mechanism of CCH-induced neuronal damage, and therefore proper treatment, remains unclear.

WIN55,212-2 (WIN) is a nonselective cannabinoid receptor agonist that has been shown to have effects on hippocampal neuron survival. In this study, we investigated the potential roles of WIN, as well as its underlying mechanism in a rat CCH model of bilateral common carotid artery occlusion.

These findings indicated that WIN may be a potential therapeutic agent for ischemic neuronal damage, involving a mechanism associated with the suppression of oxidative stress and ASK1-p38 signaling.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31808139

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12640-019-00141-8

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Cannabinoid-2 receptor activation ameliorates hepatorenal syndrome.

Free Radical Biology and Medicine“Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a life-threatening complication of end-stage liver disease characterized by the rapid decline of kidney function. Herein, we explored the therapeutic potential of targeting the cannabinoid 2 receptor (CB2-R) utilizing a commonly used mouse model of liver fibrosis and hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), induced by bile duct ligation (BDL).

KEY RESULTS:

We found that liver injury triggered marked inflammation and oxidative stress also in the kidneys of BDL-operated mice. We detected pronounced histopathological alterations with tubular injury paralleled with increased inflammation, oxidative/nitrative stress and fibrotic remodeling both in hepatic and renal tissues as well as endothelial activation and markedly impaired renal microcirculation. This was accompanied by increased CB2-R expression in both liver and the kidney tissues of diseased animals. A selective CB2-R agonist, HU-910, markedly decreased numerous markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis both in the liver and in the kidneys. HU-910 also attenuated markers of kidney injury and improved the impaired renal microcirculation in BDL-operated mice.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that oxidative stress, inflammation and microvascular dysfunction are key events in the pathogenesis of BDL-associated renal failure. Furthermore, we demonstrate that targeting the CB2-R by selective agonists may represent a promising new avenue to treat HRS by attenuating tissue and vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, fibrosis and consequent microcirculatory dysfunction in the kidneys.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31770583

“Bile duct ligation (BDL) causes hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Oxidative damage/inflammation drives liver and kidney injury following BDL. Cannabinoid-2 receptor (CB2-R) activation attenuates hepatic damage in BDL. CB2-R activation mitigates the renal inflammation and oxidative damage in BDL. CB2-R activation attenuates renal microcirculatory dysfunction in BDL.”

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The ameliorating effect of cannabinoid type 2 receptor activation on brain, lung, liver and heart damage in cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis model in rats.

International Immunopharmacology“Uncontrolled infection and increased inflammatory mediators might cause systemic inflammatory response. It is already known that Cannabinoid Type 2 (CB2) receptors, which are commonly expressed in immune cells and in many other tissues, have an effect on the regulation of immune response.

In the present study of ours, the effects of CB2 receptor agonist JWH-133 was investigated on cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced polymicrobial sepsis model in rats.

The JWH-133 treatment decreased the histopathological damage in brain, heart, lung, and liver and reduced the caspase-3, p-NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 levels in these tissues. In addition to this, JWH-133 treatment also decreased the serum TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 levels, which were increased due to CLP, and increased the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 levels.

In the present study, it was determined that the CB2 receptor agonist JWH-133 decreases the CLP-induced inflammation, and reduces the damage in brain, lung, liver and heart.

Our findings show the therapeutic potential of the activation of CB2 receptors with JWH-133 in sepsis.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31767546

“CB2 receptors are expressed in many tissues including immune cells. Activation of CB2 receptors has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effect.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1567576919318351?via%3Dihub

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Experimental Cannabinoid 2 Receptor Activation by Phyto-Derived and Synthetic Cannabinoid Ligands in LPS-Induced Interstitial Cystitis in Mice.

molecules-logo“Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic bladder disorder with unclear etiology.

The endocannabinoid system has been identified as a key regulator of immune function, with experimental evidence for the involvement of cannabinoid receptors in bladder inflammation.

This study used intravital microscopy (IVM) and behavioral testing in lipopolysaccharide-induced IC, to investigate the anti-inflammatory analgesic effects of a natural dietary sesquiterpenoid, beta-caryophyllene (BCP), which is present in cannabis among other plants, and has reported agonist actions at the cannabinoid 2 receptor (CB2R).

BCP’s anti-inflammatory actions were compared to the synthetic CB2R-selective cannabinoid, HU308, and to an FDA-approved clinical treatment (dimethyl sulfoxide: DMSO). IVM data revealed that intravesical instillation of BCP and/or HU308 significantly reduces the number of adhering leukocytes in submucosal bladder venules and improves bladder capillary perfusion.

The effects of BCP were found to be comparable to that of the selective CB2R synthetic cannabinoid, HU308, and superior to intravesical DMSO treatment. Oral treatment with BCP was also able to reduce bladder inflammation and significantly reduced mechanical allodynia in experimental IC.

Based on our findings, we believe that CB2R activation may represent a viable therapeutic target for IC, and that drugs that activate CB2R, such as the generally regarded as safe (GRAS) dietary sesquiterpenoid, BCP, may serve as an adjunct and/or alternative treatment option for alleviating symptoms of inflammation and pain in the management of IC.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31766439

https://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/24/23/4239

“β-caryophyllene (BCP) is a common constitute of the essential oils of numerous spice, food plants and major component in Cannabis.”   http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23138934

“Beta-caryophyllene is a dietary cannabinoid.”   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18574142

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The Cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 Reduces Delayed Neurologic Sequelae After Carbon Monoxide Poisoning by Promoting Microglial M2 Polarization Through ST2 Signaling.

 “Delayed neurologic sequelae (DNS) are among the most serious complications of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning caused partly by elevated neuroinflammation.

WIN 55,212-2, a non-selective agonist of cannabinoid receptors, has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory properties in various brain disorders.

The anti-inflammatory action of WIN 55,212-2 is potentially associated with driving microglial M2 polarization. ST2 signaling is important in regulating inflammatory responses and microglial polarization. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of WIN 55,212-2 on DNS after CO poisoning and elucidate its relationship with ST2-mediated microglial M2 polarization.

The behavioral tests showed that treatment with WIN 55,212-2 significantly ameliorates the cognitive impairment induced by CO poisoning.

This behavioral improvement was accompanied by reduced neuron loss, decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and a limited number of microglia in the hippocampus. Moreover, WIN 55,212-2 elevated the protein expression of IL-33 (the ligand of ST2) and ST2, increased the ratio of CD206-positive (M2 phenotype) and ST2-positive microglia, and augmented production of M2 microglia-associated cytokines in the hippocampus of CO-exposed rats.

Furthermore, we observed that the WIN 55,212-2-mediated increases in ST2 protein expression, CD206-positive and ST2-positive microglia, and microglia-associated cytokines were blocked by the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R) antagonist AM630 but not by the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) antagonist AM251. In contrast, the WIN 55,212-2-induced upregulation of the IL-33 protein expression was inhibited by AM251 but not by AM630.

Altogether, these findings reveal cannabinoid receptors as promising therapeutic agents for CO poisoning and identify ST2 signaling-related microglial M2 polarization as a new mechanism of cannabinoid-induced neuroprotection.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31732924

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12031-019-01429-2

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Δ9-THC and related cannabinoids suppress substance P- induced neurokinin NK1-receptor-mediated vomiting via activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor.

European Journal of Pharmacology

“Δ9-THC suppresses cisplatin-induced vomiting through activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors.

Cisplatin-evoked emesis is predominantly due to release of serotonin and substance P (SP) in the gut and the brainstem which subsequently stimulate their corresponding 5-HT3-and neurokinin NK1-receptors to induce vomiting. Δ9-THC can inhibit vomiting caused either by the serotonin precursor 5-HTP, or the 5-HT3 receptor selective agonist, 2-methyserotonin.

In the current study, we explored whether Δ9-THC and related CB1/CB2 receptor agonists (WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940) inhibit vomiting evoked by SP (50 mg/kg, i.p.) or the NK1 receptor selective agonist GR73632 (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Behavioral methods were employed to determine the antiemetic efficacy of cannabinoids in least shrews.

Our results showed that administration of varying doses of Δ9-THC (i.p. or s.c.), WIN55,212-2 (i.p.), or CP55,940 (i.p.) caused significant suppression of SP-evoked vomiting in a dose-dependent manner. When tested against GR73632, Δ9-THC also dose-dependently reduced the evoked emesis.

The antiemetic effect of Δ9-THC against SP-induced vomiting was prevented by low non-emetic doses of the CB1 receptor inverse-agonist/antagonist SR141716A (<10 mg/kg). We also found that the NK1 receptor antagonist netupitant can significantly suppress vomiting caused by a large emetic dose of SR141716A (20 mg/kg).

In sum, Δ9-THC and related cannabinoids suppress vomiting evoked by the nonselective (SP) and selective (GR73632) neurokinin NK1 receptor agonists via stimulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31738934

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014299919307587?via%3Dihub

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Targeting the cannabinoid receptor CB2 in a mouse model of l-dopa induced dyskinesia.

Neurobiology of Disease“L-dopa induced dyskinesia (LID) is a debilitating side-effect of the primary treatment used in Parkinson’s disease (PD), l-dopa. Here we investigate the effect of HU-308, a cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonist, on LIDs.

Utilizing a mouse model of PD and LIDs, induced by 6-OHDA and subsequent l-dopa treatment, we show that HU-308 reduced LIDs as effectively as amantadine, the current frontline treatment. Furthermore, treatment with HU-308 plus amantadine resulted in a greater anti-dyskinetic effect than maximally achieved with HU-308 alone, potentially suggesting a synergistic effect of these two treatments. Lastly, we demonstrated that treatment with HU-308 and amantadine either alone, or in combination, decreased striatal neuroinflammation, a mechanism which has been suggested to contribute to LIDs.

Taken together, our results suggest pharmacological treatments with CB2 agonists merit further investigation as therapies for LIDs in PD patients. Furthermore, since CB2 receptors are thought to be primarily expressed on, and signal through, glia, our data provide weight to suggestion that neuroinflammation, or more specifically, altered glial function, plays a role in development of LIDs.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31669673

“Collectively, our findings suggest CB2 agonists offer a putative target to treat LIDs, with efficacy comparable to the frontline treatment amantadine. Our study suggests that targeting glial function may be an important strategy for developing therapies for treating LIDs, a major unmet need for PD patients.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969996119303213?via%3Dihub

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Structure of an allosteric modulator bound to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

Image result for nature chemical biology“The CB1 receptor mediates the central nervous system response to cannabinoids, and is a drug target for pain, anxiety and seizures.

CB1 also responds to allosteric modulators, which influence cannabinoid binding and efficacy.

To understand the mechanism of these compounds, we solved the crystal structure of CB1 with the negative allosteric modulator (NAM) ORG27569 and the agonist CP55940.

The structure reveals that the NAM binds to an extrahelical site within the inner leaflet of the membrane, which overlaps with a conserved site of cholesterol interaction in many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs).

The ternary structure with ORG27569 and CP55940 captures an intermediate state of the receptor, in which aromatic residues at the base of the agonist-binding pocket adopt an inactive conformation despite the large contraction of the orthosteric pocket.

The structure illustrates a potential strategy for drug modulation of CB1 and other class A GPCRs.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31659318

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41589-019-0387-2

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Cannabinoid receptor 2‑selective agonist JWH015 attenuates bone cancer pain through the amelioration of impaired autophagy flux induced by inflammatory mediators in the spinal cord.

Journal Cover “Bone cancer pain (BCP) is a severe complication of advanced bone cancer.

Although cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) agonists may have an analgesic effect, the underlying mechanism remains unclear.

CB2 serves a protective role in various pathological states through the activation of autophagy. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine whether the analgesic effects of the selective CB2 agonist JWH015 was mediated by the activation of autophagy in BCP.

The results of the present study suggested that the impairment of autophagy flux was induced by glia‑derived inflammatory mediators in spinal neurons. Intrathecal administration of the selective CB2 agonist JWH015 ameliorated autophagy flux through the downregulation of IL‑1β and IL‑6 and attenuated BCP.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31661120

https://www.spandidos-publications.com/10.3892/mmr.2019.10772

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