Inhibition of Wnt/β-Catenin pathway and Histone acetyltransferase activity by Rimonabant: a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

 

“In a high percentage (≥85%) of both sporadic and familial adenomatous polyposis forms of colorectal cancer (CRC), the inactivation of the APC tumor suppressor gene initiates tumor formation and modulates the Wnt/β-Catenin transduction pathways involved in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and metastasis.

Increasing evidence showed that the endocannabinoids control tumor growth and progression, both in vitro and in vivo.

We evaluated the effect of Rimonabant, a Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) inverse agonist, on the Wnt/β-Catenin pathway in HCT116 and SW48 cell lines carrying the genetic profile of metastatic CRC poorly responsive to chemotherapies.

Obtained data heavily supported the rationale for the use of cannabinoids in combined therapies for metastatic CRC harbouring activating mutations of β-Catenin.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28916833

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-11688-x

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G protein-coupled receptor GPR55 promotes colorectal cancer and has opposing effects to cannabinoid receptor 1.

International Journal of Cancer

“The putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55 has been shown to play a tumor-promoting role in various cancers, and is involved in many physiological and pathological processes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

While the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 ) has been reported to suppress intestinal tumor growth, the role of GPR55 in the development of GI cancers is unclear. We, therefore, aimed at elucidating the role of GPR55 in colorectal cancer (CRC), the third most common cancer worldwide.

Collectively, our data suggest that GPR55 and CB1 play differential roles in colon carcinogenesis where the former seems to act as oncogene and the latter as tumor suppressor.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28875496

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.31030/abstract

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Can You Pass the Acid Test? Critical Review and Novel Therapeutic Perspectives of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic Acid A.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. publishers

“Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A) is the acidic precursor of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive compound found in Cannabis sativa. THCA-A is biosynthesized and accumulated in glandular trichomes present on flowers and leaves, where it serves protective functions and can represent up to 90% of the total THC contained in the plant. THCA-A slowly decarboxylates to form THC during storage and fermentation and can further degrade to cannabinol. Decarboxylation also occurs rapidly during baking of edibles, smoking, or vaporizing, the most common ways in which the general population consumes Cannabis. Contrary to THC, THCA-A does not elicit psychoactive effects in humans and, perhaps for this reason, its pharmacological value is often neglected. In fact, many studies use the term “THCA” to refer indistinctly to several acid derivatives of THC. Despite this perception, many in vitro studies seem to indicate that THCA-A interacts with a number of molecular targets and displays a robust pharmacological profile that includes potential anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, and antineoplastic properties. Moreover, the few in vivo studies performed with THCA-A indicate that this compound exerts pharmacological actions in rodents, likely by engaging type-1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptors. Although these findings may seem counterintuitive due to the lack of cannabinoid-related psychoactivity, a careful perusal of the available literature yields a plausible explanation to this conundrum and points toward novel therapeutic perspectives for raw, unheated Cannabis preparations in humans.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28861488

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/can.2016.0008

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CB1 Receptors Signaling in the Brain: Extracting Specificity from Ubiquity.

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“Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are amongst the most ubiquitous signaling molecules in the nervous system. Over the past few decades, observations based on a large volume of work, first examining the pharmacological effects of exogenous cannabinoids, and then the physiological functions of eCBs, have directly challenged long-held and dogmatic views about communication, plasticity and behavior in the Central Nervous System (CNS). The eCBs and their cognate cannabinoid receptors exhibit a number of unique properties that distinguish them from the widely studied classical amino acid transmitters, neuropeptides and catecholamines. Although we now have a loose set of mechanistic rules based on experimental findings, new studies continue to reveal that our understanding of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is continuously evolving and challenging long-held conventions. Here, we will briefly summarize findings on the current canonical view of the ‘endocannabinoid system’ and will address novel aspects that reveal how a nearly ubiquitous system can determine highly specific functions in the brain. In particular, we will focus on findings that push for an expansion of our ideas around long-held beliefs about eCB signaling that, whilst clearly true, may be contributing to an oversimplified perspective on how cannabinoid signaling at the microscopic level impacts behavior at the macroscopic level.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28862250

https://www.nature.com/npp/journal/vaop/naam/abs/npp2017206a.html

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Proximal Tubular Cannabinoid-1 Receptor Regulates Obesity-Induced CKD.

Figure

“Obesity-related structural and functional changes in the kidney develop early in the course of obesity and occur independently of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Activating the renal cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) induces nephropathy, whereas CB1R blockade improves kidney function. Whether these effects are mediated via a specific cell type within the kidney remains unknown. Here, we show that specific deletion of CB1R in the renal proximal tubule cells did not protect the mice from obesity, but markedly attenuated the obesity-induced lipid accumulation in the kidney and renal dysfunction, injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. These effects associated with increased activation of liver kinase B1 and the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase, as well as enhanced fatty acid β-oxidation. Collectively, these findings indicate that renal proximal tubule cell CB1R contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity-induced renal lipotoxicity and nephropathy by regulating the liver kinase B1/AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28860163

http://jasn.asnjournals.org/content/early/2017/08/30/ASN.2016101085

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Characterization of Structurally Novel G Protein Biased CB1 Agonists: Implications for Drug Development.

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“The human cannabinoid subtype 1 receptor (hCB1R) is highly expressed in the CNS and serves as a therapeutic target for endogenous ligands as well as plant-derived and synthetic cannabinoids. Unfortunately, acute use of hCB1R agonists produces unwanted psychotropic effects and chronic administration results in development of tolerance and dependence, limiting the potential clinical use of these ligands. Studies in β-arrestin knockout mice suggest that interaction of certain GPCRs, including μ-, δ-, κ-opioid and hCB1Rs, with β-arrestins might be responsible for several adverse effects produced by agonists acting at these receptors. Indeed, agonists that bias opioid receptor activation toward G-protein, relative to β-arrestin signaling, produce less severe adverse effects. These observations indicate that therapeutic utility of agonists acting at hCB1Rs might be improved by development of G-protein biased hCB1R agonists. Our laboratory recently reported a novel class of indole quinulidinone (IQD) compounds that bind cannabinoid receptors with relatively high affinity and act with varying efficacy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether agonists in this novel cannabinoid class exhibit ligand bias at hCB1 receptors. Our studies found that a novel IQD-derived hCB1receptor agonist PNR-4-20 elicits robust G protein-dependent signaling, with transduction ratios similar to the non-biased hCB1R agonist CP-55,940. In marked contrast to CP-55,940, PNR-4-20 produces little to no β-arrestin 2 recruitment. Quantitative calculation of bias factors indicates that PNR-4-20 exhibits from 5.4-fold to 29.5-fold bias for G protein, relative to β-arrestin 2 signaling (when compared to G protein activation or inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, respectively). Importantly, as expected due to reduced β-arrestin 2 recruitment, chronic exposure of cells to PNR-4-20 results in significantly less desensitization and down-regulation of hCB1Rs compared to similar treatment with CP-55,940. PNR-4-20 (i.p.) is active in the cannabinoid tetrad in mice and chronic treatment results in development of less persistent tolerance and no significant withdrawal signs when compared to animals repeatedly exposed to the non-biased full agoinst JWH-018 or Δ9-THC. Finally, studies of a structurally similar analog PNR- 4-02 show that it is also a G protein biased hCB1R agonist. It is predicted that cannabinoid agonists that bias hCB1R activation toward G protein, relative to β-arrestin 2 signaling, will produce fewer and less severe adverse effects both acutely and chronically.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28838808

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1043661816314244

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Antidote to cannabinoid intoxication: Inverse cannabinoid receptor one (CB1) agonism by N-(Piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamidse (AM251) reverses the hypothermic effects of cannabinoid receptor one agonism by 1-Naphthalenyl [4-(pentyloxy)-1-naphthalenyl] methanone (CB13) in mice.

Image result for Br J Pharmacol

“Cannabis is a recreational drug leading to intoxication, due to cannabinoid receptor one (CB1 ) stimulation.

The aim of the study was to determine whether CB1 antagonism could reverse physical cannabimimetic effects.

In this study, the pre-existing, central nervous system-related cannabimimetic effects, measured via the hypothermic effect, induced by CB1 receptor agonism where therapeutically treated and were rapidly reversed by CB1 receptor antagonism/inverse agonism. There was also a subjective reversal of visually-evident sedation.

CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS:

Cannabinoid receptor antagonists have been used in thousands of people and so may provide a single-dose antidote to cannabinoid intoxication, which may save human life,”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28800377

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Endocannabinoids exert CB1 receptor-mediated neuroprotective effects in models of neuronal damage induced by HIV-1 Tat protein.

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“In the era of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is considered a chronic disease that specifically targets the brain and causes HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Endocannabinoids (eCBs) elicit neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory actions in several central nervous system (CNS) disease models, but their effects in HAND remain unknown. HIV-1 does not infect neurons, but produces viral toxins, such as transactivator of transcription (Tat), that disrupt neuronal calcium equilibrium and give rise to synaptodendritic injuries and cell death, the former being highly correlated with HAND. Consequently, we tested whether the eCBs N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide/AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) offer neuroprotective actions in a neuronal culture model. Specifically, we examined the neuroprotective actions of these eCBs on Tat excitotoxicity in primary cultures of prefrontal cortex neurons (PFC), and whether cannabinoid receptors mediate this neuroprotection. Tat-induced excitotoxicity was reflected by increased intracellular calcium levels, synaptodendritic damage, neuronal excitability, and neuronal death. Further, upregulation of cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) protein levels was noted in the presence of HIV-1 Tat. The direct application of AEA and 2-AG reduced excitotoxic levels of intracellular calcium and promoted neuronal survival following Tat exposure, which was prevented by the CB1R antagonist rimonabant, but not by the CB2R antagonist AM630. Overall, our findings indicate that eCBs protect PFC neurons from Tat excitotoxicity in vitro via a CB1R-related mechanism. Thus, the eCB system possesses promising targets for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders associated with HIV-1 infection.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28733129

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1044743117300830

 

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The In Vivo Effects of the CB1-Positive Allosteric Modulator GAT229 on Intraocular Pressure in Ocular Normotensive and Hypertensive Mice.

Image result for J Ocul Pharmacol Ther.

“Orthosteric cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) activation leads to decreases in intraocular pressure (IOP).

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the novel CB1-positive allosteric modulator (PAM) GAT229 on IOP.

The CB1 PAM GAT229 reduces IOP in ocular hypertensive mice and enhanced CB1-mediated IOP reduction when combined with subthreshold CB1 orthosteric ligands in normotensive mice. Administration of CB1 PAMs may provide a novel approach to reduce IOP with fewer of the disadvantages associated with orthosteric CB1 activation.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28719234

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CB₁ receptor antagonism in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis interferes with affective opioid withdrawal in rats.

Image result for Behav Neurosci.

“The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is a region of the extended amygdala that is implicated in addiction, anxiety, and stress related behaviors. This region has been identified in mediating the aversive state of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal (MWD) and cannabinoid Type I (CB1) receptors have been found to modulate neurotransmission within this region.

Previous findings suggest that the CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist, AM251, administered systemically or by infusion into the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) prevented the aversive affective properties of MWD as measured by conditioned place aversion learning.

The current findings emphasize an important role for the BNST in opioid withdrawal and suggest that the ameliorative effects of systemically administered CB1 antagonists are mediated, in part, by their actions within this region.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28714716

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