Cannabidiol and other cannabinoids reduce microglial activation in vitro and in vivo: relevance to Alzheimer’s disease.

“Microglial activation is an invariant feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). It is noteworthy that cannabinoids are neuroprotective by preventing β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced microglial activation both in vitro and in vivo… the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) has shown anti-inflammatory properties in different paradigms…

Cannabinoids, whether plant-derived, synthetic, or endocannabinoids, exert their functions through activation of cannabinoid receptors, two of which have been well characterized to date: CB1 and CB2. Cannabinoids are neuroprotective against excitotoxicity and acute brain damage, both in vitro and in vivo. Several mechanisms account for the neuroprotection afforded by this type of drug such as blockade of excitotoxicity, reduction of calcium influx, antioxidant properties of the compounds, or enhanced trophic factor support. A decrease in proinflammatory mediators brought about by cannabinoids may be also involved in their neuroprotection… Cannabidiol (CBD), the major plant-derived nonpsychotropic constituent of marijuana, is of potential therapeutic interest in different disease conditions (e.g., inflammation)…

…this kind of drug with neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects may be of interest in the prevention of AD inflammation, in particular CB2-selective agonists, which are devoid of psychoactive effects…

Cannabidiol and other cannabinoids reduce microglial activation in vitro and in vivo…

CBD is able to modulate microglial cell function in vitro and induce beneficial effects in an in vivo model of AD.

Given that CBD lacks psychoactivity, it may represent a novel therapeutic approach for this neurological disease.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3102548/

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