GPR55 – a putative “type 3” cannabinoid receptor in inflammation.

“G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) shares numerous cannabinoid ligands with CB1 and CB2 receptors despite low homology with those classical cannabinoid receptors. The pharmacology of GPR55 is not yet fully elucidated; however, GPR55 utilizes a different signaling system and downstream cascade associated with the receptor. Therefore, GPR55 has emerged as a putative “type 3″ cannabinoid receptor, establishing a novel class of cannabinoid receptor. Furthermore, the recent evidence of GPR55-CB1 and GPR55-CB2 heteromerization along with its broad distribution from central nervous system to peripheries suggests the importance of GPR55 in various cellular processes and pathologies and as a potential therapeutic target in inflammation.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26669245

https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jbcpp.2016.27.issue-3/jbcpp-2015-0080/jbcpp-2015-0080.xml

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

GPR55 – a putative “type 3” cannabinoid receptor in inflammation.

“G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) shares numerous cannabinoid ligands with CB1 and CB2 receptors despite low homology with those classical cannabinoid receptors. The pharmacology of GPR55 is not yet fully elucidated; however, GPR55 utilizes a different signaling system and downstream cascade associated with the receptor. Therefore, GPR55 has emerged as a putative “type 3” cannabinoid receptor, establishing a novel class of cannabinoid receptor. Furthermore, the recent evidence of GPR55-CB1 and GPR55-CB2 heteromerization along with its broad distribution from central nervous system to peripheries suggests the importance of GPR55 in various cellular processes and pathologies and as a potential therapeutic target in inflammation.”

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

[Cannabis and cannabinoids as drugs].

Abstract

“BACKGROUND:

Cannabis has been used throughout human history. Delta (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary psychoactive component of cannabis. THC metabolises to 11-OH-THC and further to THC-acid, which is an inactive metabolite. We present an overview of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cannabinoids.

MATERIAL AND METHOD:

This article is based on selected literature with an emphasis on the pharmacodynamics of cannabinoids.

RESULTS AND INTERPRETATION:

It has been demonstrated that mammalian tissues express cannabinoid receptors (CB1, CB2 and most probably CB3) and endogenous ligands for these. Knowledge of these receptors has lead to the development of components that stimulate (CB-agonists) or block their function (CB-antagonists). This opens up for the study of any potential therapeutic effects of cannabinoids. Research on a possible therapeutic potential of cannabinoids should however not overshadow the well-documented negative effects of cannabis; i.e. impaired cognitive functions, intoxication and an increased risk for development of psychosis and psychotic symptoms.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17332810

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous