Beneficial effects of the phytocannabinoid Δ9-THCV in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease.

Neurobiology of Disease“The antioxidant and CB2 receptor agonist properties of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (Δ9-THCV) afforded neuroprotection in experimental Parkinson’s disease (PD), whereas its CB1 receptor antagonist profile at doses lower than 5 mg/kg caused anti-hypokinetic effects.

In the present study, we investigated the anti-dyskinetic potential of Δ9-THCV (administered i.p. at 2 mg/kg for two weeks), which had not been investigated before.

In summary, our data support the anti-dyskinetic potential of Δ9-THCV, both to delay the occurrence and to attenuate the magnitude of dyskinetic signs. Although further studies are clearly required to determine the clinical significance of these data in humans, the results nevertheless situate Δ9-THCV in a promising position for developing a cannabinoid-based therapy for patients with PD.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32387338

“Δ9-THCV exhibited anti-dyskinetic properties in L-DOPA-treated Pitx3ak mutant mice. It delayed the onset of dyskinetic signs and reduced their neurochemical changes. It also reduced their intensity when given once dyskinesia was already present. This potential adds to other properties of Δ9-THCV as antiparkinsonian therapy.

In summary, our data support the anti-dyskinetic potential of Δ9-THCV to ameliorate adverse effects caused by L-DOPA, in particular delaying the occurrence and attenuating the magnitude of dyskinetic signs. This adds to its promising symptom-alleviating and neuroprotective properties described previously. Although further studies are clearly required to determine the clinical significance of these data in humans, the results nevertheless situate Δ9-THCV in a promising position for developing a cannabinoid-based therapy for PD patients.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969996120301674?via%3Dihub

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Cannabinoid CB1 antagonists possess antiparkinsonian efficacy only in rats with very severe nigral lesion in experimental parkinsonism.

Abstract

“We have observed that systemic administration of cannabinoid CB1 antagonists exerts antiparkinsonian effects in rats with very severe nigral lesion (>95% cell loss), but not in rats with less severe lesion (85-95% cell loss). Local injections into denervated striatum and corresponding globus pallidus reduced parkinsonian asymmetry. Infusions into lesioned substantia nigra enhanced motor asymmetries, but this effect was absent after very severe nigral lesion. At the striatal level, CB1 antagonists act enhancing dopamine D1 receptor function and reducing D2 receptor function. Striatal dopaminergic denervation did not affect cannabinoid CB1 receptor coupling to G proteins. These results suggest that (i) systemic administration of CB1 antagonists in rats with severe nigral degeneration is ineffective because striatopallidal-mediated motor effects are antagonized by nigra-mediated activity, and (ii) CB1 antagonists exert antiparkinsonian effects after very severe nigral degeneration because nigra-mediated inhibition disappears. CB1 receptor antagonists that lack psychoactive effects might be of therapeutic value in the control of very advanced stage of Parkinson’s disease in humans.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15755685

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous