The Effects of Cannabidiol and Prognostic Role of TRPV2 in Human Endometrial Cancer

ijms-logo“Several studies support, both in vitro and in vivo, the anti-cancer effects of cannabidiol (CBD), a transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) ligand. TRPV2, often dysregulated in tumors, is associated with altered cell proliferation and aggressiveness.

Endometrial cancer (EC) is historically divided in type I endometrioid EC and type II non-endometrioid EC, associated with poor prognosis. Treatment options with chemotherapy and combinations with radiation showed only limited efficacy. Since no data are reported concerning TRPV2 expression as well as CBD potential effects in EC, the aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of TRPV2 in biopsies and cell lines as well as the effects of CBD in in vitro models. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), cell viability, migration, and chemo-resistance have been evaluated.

Results show that TRPV2 expression increased with the malignancy of the cancer tissue and correlated with shorter PFS (p = 0.0224). Moreover, in vitro TRPV2 over-expression in Ishikawa cell line increased migratory ability and response to cisplatin. CBD reduced cell viability, activating predominantly apoptosis in type I cells and autophagy in mixed type EC cells. The CBD improved chemotherapeutic drugs cytotoxic effects, enhanced by TRPV2 over-expression. Hence, TRPV2 could be considered as a marker for optimizing the therapy and CBD might be a useful therapeutic option as adjuvant therapy.”

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32751388/

https://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/21/15/5409

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Molecular mechanism of TRPV2 channel modulation by cannabidiol.

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“Transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) plays a critical role in neuronal development, cardiac function, immunity, and cancer.

Cannabidiol (CBD), the non-psychotropic therapeutically active ingredient of Cannabis sativa, is an activator of TRPV2 and also modulates other transient receptor potential (TRP) channels.

We show that CBD interacts with TRPV2 through a hydrophobic pocket located between S5 and S6 helices of adjacent subunits, which differs from known ligand and lipid binding sites in other TRP channels. CBD-bound TRPV2 structures revealed that the S4-S5 linker plays a critical role in channel gating upon CBD binding. Additionally, nanodiscs permitted us to visualize two distinct TRPV2 apo states in a lipid environment.

Together these results provide a foundation to further understand TRPV channel gating, their divergent physiological functions, and to accelerate structure-based drug design.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31566564

https://elifesciences.org/articles/48792

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The effects of cannabidiol and its synergism with bortezomib in multiple myeloma cell lines. A role for transient receptor potential vanilloid type-2.

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“Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell (PC) malignancy characterised by the accumulation of a monoclonal PC population in the bone marrow (BM).

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid with antitumoural activities, and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-2 (TRPV2) channel has been reported as a potential CBD receptor.

TRPV2 activation by CBD decreases proliferation and increases susceptibility to drug-induced cell death in human cancer cells.

However, no functional role has been ascribed to CBD and TRPV2 in MM. In this study, we identified the presence of heterogeneous CD138+TRPV2+ and CD138+TRPV2- PC populations in MM patients, whereas only the CD138+ TRPV2- population was present in RPMI8226 and U266 MM cell lines.

Because bortezomib (BORT) is commonly used in MM treatment, we investigated the effects of CBD and BORT in CD138+TRPV2- MM cells and in MM cell lines transfected with TRPV2 (CD138+TRPV2+).

These results showed that CBD by itself or in synergy with BORT strongly inhibited growth, arrested cell cycle progression and induced MM cells death by regulating the ERK, AKT and NF-κB pathways with major effects in TRPV2+ cells.

These data provide a rationale for using CBD to increase the activity of proteasome inhibitors in MM.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24293211

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Role of ionotropic cannabinoid receptors in peripheral antinociception and antihyperalgesia

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“Although cannabinoids have been used for millennia for treating pain and other symptoms, their mechanisms of action remain obscure.

With the heralded identification of multiple G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediating cannabinoid effects nearly two decades ago, the mystery of cannabinoid pharmacology was thought to be solved…

Despite the wealth of information on cannabinoid-induced peripheral antihyperalgesic and antinociceptive effects in many pain models, the molecular mechanism(s) for these actions remains unknown.

Although metabotropic cannabinoid receptors have important roles in many pharmacological actions of cannabinoids, recent studies have led to the recognition of a family of at least five ionotropic cannabinoid receptors (ICRs). The known ICRs are members of the family of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and include TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM8 and TRPA1.

Cannabinoid activation of ICRs can result in desensitization of the TRPA1 and TRPV1 channel activities, inhibition of nociceptors and antihyperalgesia and antinociception in certain pain models.

Thus, cannabinoids activate both metabotropic and ionotropic mechanisms to produce peripheral analgesic effects.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2863326/

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