Anti-Tumorigenic Properties of Omega-3 Endocannabinoid Epoxides.

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry

“Accumulating studies have linked inflammation to tumor progression.

Dietary omega-3 fatty acids including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been shown to suppress tumor growth through their conversion to epoxide metabolites. Alternatively, DHA is converted enzymatically into docosahexaenoylethanolamide (DHEA), an endocannabinoid with anti-proliferative activity.

Recently, we reported a novel class of anti-inflammatory DHEA-epoxides (EDP-EAs) that contain both ethanolamide and epoxide moieties. Herein we evaluate the anti-tumorigenic properties of EDP-EAs in an osteosarcoma model.

First, we show ~80% increase in EDP-EAs in metastatic lungs versus normal mouse lungs. We found significant differences in the apoptotic and anti-migratory potency of the different EDP-EA regioisomers, which are partly mediated through cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1).

Furthermore, we synthesized derivatives of the most pro-apoptotic regioisomer. These derivatives had reduced hydrolytic susceptibility to fatty acid-amide hydrolase and increased CB1 binding.

Collectively, we report a novel class of EDP-EAs that exhibit anti-angiogenic, anti-tumorigenic and anti-migratory properties in osteosarcoma.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29856219

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.8b00243

“Omega-3 Fatty Byproducts May Have Anticancer Effects.https://scienceblog.com/502227/omega-3-fatty-byproducts-may-have-anticancer-effects/
“Products of omega-3 fatty acid metabolism may have anticancer effects, study shows” https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-07-products-omega-fatty-acid-metabolism.html
“Omega-3-derived cannabinoid may stop cancer. New research suggests that the body’s natural pain-killer, the “endocannabinoid system,” may also have cancer-fighting properties when “activated” by omega-3 fatty acids.” https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322482.php
“Products of omega-3 fatty acid metabolism may have anticancer effects” https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/07/180713220137.htm
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Targeting cannabinoid receptors in gastrointestinal cancers for therapeutic uses: current status and future perspectives

Publication Cover

“A number of studies have consistently shown that cannabinoids are able to prevent or reduce carcinogenesis in different animal models of colon cancer.

Cannabinoids, via CB1 and possibly CB2 receptors, suppress proliferation and migration and stimulate apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells.

Convincing scientific evidence suggests that cannabinoids, in addition to their well-known use in palliative care in oncology (e.g. improvement of appetite, attenuation of nausea associated to antitumoral medicines, alleviation of moderate neuropathic pain) can reduce, via antiproliferative and proapoptotic as well as by inhibiting angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis or by attenuating inflammation, the growth of cancer cells and hinder the development of experimental colon carcinogenesis in vivo.”

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17474124.2017.1367663?src=recsys

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Cannabinoids as therapeutic agents in cancer: current status and future implications

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“Cannabinoids… active compounds of the Cannabis sativa plant… cannabinoids are clinically used for anti-palliative effects, recent studies open a promising possibility as anti-cancer agents.

They have been shown to possess anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro as well as in vivo in different cancer models…”  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25115386

“Cannabinoids… the active compounds of the Cannabis sativa plant… anti-cancer agents… anti-proliferative… anti-angiogenic… anti-migratory and anti-invasive… The administration of single cannabinoids might produce limited relief compared to the administration of crude extract of plant containing multiple cannabinoids, terpenes and flavanoids.” Full-text: http://www.impactjournals.com/oncotarget/index.php?journal=oncotarget&page=article&op=view&path%5B0%5D=2233&path%5B1%5D=3664

http://www.thctotalhealthcare.com/category/cancer/

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Cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive cannabinoid compound, affects metalloproteinases and pro-survival intracellular pathways in u87-mg human glioma cell line

“Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors… Recently, we have shown that the non-psychoactive cannabinoid compound cannabidiol (CBD) induced apoptosis of human glioma cells in vitro and tumor regression in vivo…the present study was to investigate the anti-migratory action of CBD…

 In conclusion, the present investigation adds further insights into the antitumoral action of the non-psychoactive CBD, showing multiple mechanisms through which the cannabinoid inhibits glioma cell growth and motility.

As CBD is a natural compound without psychotropic and side effects, these data lead us to consider CBD as a new potential anticancer drug useful in the management of gliomas.”

http://air.unimi.it/handle/2434/142533

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