Cannabidiol: an overview of some chemical and pharmacological aspects. Part I: chemical aspects.

“Over the last few years considerable attention has focused on cannabidiol (CBD), a major non-psychotropic constituent of Cannabis. In Part I of this review we present a condensed survey of the chemistry of CBD; in Part II, to be published later, we shall discuss the anti-convulsive, anti-anxiety, anti-psychotic, anti-nausea and anti-rheumatoid arthritic properties of CBD. CBD does not bind to the known cannabinoid receptors and its mechanism of action is yet unknown. In Part II we shall also present evidence that it is conceivable that, in part at least, its effects are due to its recently discovered inhibition of anandamide uptake and hydrolysis and to its anti-oxidative effect.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12505688

http://www.scribd.com/doc/52920296/Cannabidiol-an-Overview-of-Some-Chemical-and-Pharmacological-Aspects-Part-I-Chemical-Aspects

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Cannabidiol in vivo blunts beta-amyloid induced neuroinflammation by suppressing IL-1beta and iNOS expression.

“Pharmacological inhibition of beta-amyloid (Aβ) induced reactive gliosis may represent a novel rationale to develop drugs able to blunt neuronal damage and slow the course of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Cannabidiol (CBD), the main non-psychotropic natural cannabinoid, exerts in vitro a combination of neuroprotective effects in different models of Aβ neurotoxicity. The present study, performed in a mouse model of AD-related neuroinflammation, was aimed at confirming in vivo the previously reported antiinflammatory properties of CBD.

Cannabidiol (CBD), the main non-psychotropic component of the glandular hairs of Cannabis sativa, exhibits a plethora of actions including anti-convulsive, sedative, hypnotic, anti-psychotic, anti-nausea, anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesic properties. CBD has been proved to exert in vitro a combination of neuroprotective effects in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity, including anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic effects, tau protein hyperphosphorylation inhibition through the Wnt pathway, and marked decrease of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression and nitrite production in Aβ-challenged differentiated rat neuronal cells.

In spite of the large amount of data describing the significant neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of CBD in vitro, to date no evidence has been provided showing similar effects in vivo. To achieve this, the present study investigated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of CBD in a mouse model of AD-related neuroinflammation induced by the intrahippocampal injection of the human Aβ (1–42) fragment.

The results of the present study confirm in vivo anti-inflammatory actions of CBD, emphasizing the importance of this compound as a novel promising pharmacological tool capable of attenuating Aβ evoked neuroinflammatory responses.

 …on the basis of the present results, CBD, a drug well tolerated in humans, may be regarded as an attractive medical alternative for the treatment of AD, because of its lack of psychoactive and cognitive effects.”

Read more: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2189818/

 

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

A molecular link between the active component of marijuana and Alzheimer’s disease pathology.

“A link between the endocannabinoid system and Alzheimer’s disease has been discovered which has provided a new therapeutic target for the treatment of patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. These studies have demonstrated the ability of cannabinoids to provide neuroprotection against β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) toxicity.

Here, we demonstrate that the active component of marijuana, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), competitively inhibits the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as well as prevents AChE-induced amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) aggregation, the key pathological marker of Alzheimer’s disease. 

 Compared to currently approved drugs prescribed for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, THC is a considerably superior inhibitor of Aβ aggregation, and this study provides a previously unrecognized molecular mechanism through which cannabinoid molecules may directly impact the progression of this debilitating disease.

Since the characterization of the Cannabis sativa-produced cannabinoid, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), in the 1960’s,1 this natural product has been widely explored as an anti-emetic, anti-convulsive, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic.”

Read more: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2562334/

 

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Compound in cannabis may help treat epilepsy, researchers say

“British researchers have determined that a little-studied chemical in the cannabis plant could lead to effective treatments for epilepsy, with few to no side effects.

The team at Britain’s University of Reading, working with GW Pharmaceuticals and Otsuka Pharmaceuticals, tested cannabidivarin, or CBDV, in rats and mice afflicted with six types of epilepsy and found it “strongly suppressed seizures” without causing the uncontrollable shaking and other side effects of existing anti-epilepsy drugs.

The casual use of marijuana — or cannabis — to control seizures dates back to ancient times. Its most prominent component, THC, is among those shown in animal studies to have strong anti-convulsant properties…”

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/sep/14/news/la-sn-cannabis-cbdv-epilepsy-20120914

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous