The relationship of endocannabinoidome lipid mediators with pain and psychological stress in women with fibromyalgia – a case control study.

“Characterized by chronic widespread pain, generalized hyperalgesia, and psychological stress fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to diagnose and lacks effective treatments.

The endocannabinoids – arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the related oleoylethanolamide (OEA), palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), and stearoylethanolamide (SEA) – are endogenous lipid mediators with analgesic and anti-inflammatory characteristics, in company with psychological modulating properties (e.g., stress and anxiety), and are included in a new emerging “ome”, the endocannabinoidome.

This case -control study compared the concentration differences of AEA, OEA, PEA, SEA, and 2-AG in 104 women with FM and 116 healthy controls (CON). All participants OEArated their pain, anxiety, depression, and current health status. The relationships between the lipid concentrations and the clinical assessments were investigated using powerful multivariate data analysis and traditional bivariate statistics. The concentrations of OEA, PEA, SEA, and 2-AG were significantly higher in FM than in CON; significance remained for OEA and SEA after controlling for BMI and age. 2-AG correlated positively with FM duration and BMI, and to some extent negatively with pain, anxiety, depression, and health status. In FM, AEA correlated positively with depression ratings.

The elevated circulating levels of endocannabinoidome lipids suggest that these lipids play a role in the complex pathophysiology of FM and might be signs of ongoing low-grade inflammation in FM. Although the investigated lipids are significantly altered in FM their biological roles are uncertain with respect to the clinical manifestations of FM. Thus, plasma lipids alone are not good biomarkers for FM.

PERSPECTIVE:

This study reports about elevated plasma levels of endocannabinoidome lipid mediators in FM. The lipids suitability to work as biomarkers for FM in the clinic were low, however their altered levels indicate that a metabolic asymmetry is ongoing in FM, which could serve as basis during explorative FM pain management.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29885369

https://www.jpain.org/article/S1526-5900(18)30197-4/fulltext

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Antiepileptogenic Effect of Subchronic Palmitoylethanolamide Treatment in a Mouse Model of Acute Epilepsy.

 Image result for frontiers in molecular neuroscience

“Research on the antiepileptic effects of (endo-)cannabinoids has remarkably progressed in the years following the discovery of fundamental role of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in controlling neural excitability. Moreover, an increasing number of well-documented cases of epilepsy patients exhibiting multi-drug resistance report beneficial effects of cannabis use.

Pre-clinical and clinical research has increasingly focused on the antiepileptic effectiveness of exogenous administration of cannabinoids and/or pharmacologically induced increase of eCBs such as anandamide (also known as arachidonoylethanolamide [AEA]). Concomitant research has uncovered the contribution of neuroinflammatory processes and peripheral immunity to the onset and progression of epilepsy.

Accordingly, modulation of inflammatory pathways such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was pursued as alternative therapeutic strategy for epilepsy. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous fatty acid amide related to the centrally and peripherally present eCB AEA, and is a naturally occurring nutrient that has long been recognized for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties.

Neuroprotective and anti-hyperalgesic properties of PEA were evidenced in neurodegenerative diseases, and antiepileptic effects in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), maximal electroshock (MES) and amygdaloid kindling models of epileptic seizures. Moreover, numerous clinical trials in chronic pain revealed that PEA treatment is devoid of addiction potential, dose limiting side effects and psychoactive effects, rendering PEA an appealing candidate as antiepileptic compound or adjuvant.

In the present study, we aimed at assessing antiepileptic properties of PEA in a mouse model of acute epileptic seizures induced by systemic administration of kainic acid (KA).

Here, we demonstrate that subchronic administration of PEA significantly alleviates seizure intensity, promotes neuroprotection and induces modulation of the plasma and hippocampal eCB and eiC levels in systemic KA-injected mice.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29593494

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnmol.2018.00067/full

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Cannabidiol and Palmitoylethanolamide are anti-inflammatory in the acutely inflamed human colon.

Clinical Science “We sought to quantify the anti-inflammatory effects of two cannabinoid drugs: cannabidiol (CBD) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), in cultured cell lines and compared this effect with experimentally inflamed explant human colonic tissue.  These effects were explored in acutely and chronically inflamed colon, using inflammatory bowel disease and appendicitis explants.

Results:   IFNγ and TNFα treatment increased phosphoprotein and cytokine levels in Caco-2 cultures and colonic explants.  Phosphoprotein levels were significantly reduced by PEA or CBD in Caco-2 cultures and colonic explants.  CBD and PEA prevented increases in cytokine production in explant colon, but not in Caco-2 cells. CBD effects were blocked by the CB2antagonist AM630 and TRPV1 antagonist SB366791.  PEA effects were blocked by the PPARα antagonist GW6471.  PEA and CBD were anti-inflammatory in IBD and appendicitis explants.

Conclusion: PEA and CBD are anti-inflammatory in the human colon.  This effect is not seen in cultured epithelial cells. Appropriately sized clinical trials should assess their efficacy.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28954820

http://www.clinsci.org/content/early/2017/09/26/CS20171288

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Targeting Cutaneous Cannabinoid Signaling in Inflammation – A “High”-way to Heal?

Image result for EBioMedicine

“The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a recently emerging complex regulator of multiple physiological processes. It comprises several endogenous ligands (e.g. N-arachidonoylethanolamine, a.k.a. anandamide [AEA], 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG], palmitoylethanolamide [PEA], etc.), a number of endocannabinoid (eCB)-responsive receptors (e.g. CB1 and CB2, etc.), as well as enzymes and transporters involved in the synthesis and degradation of the eCBs.

Among many other tissues and organs, various members of the ECS were shown to be expressed in the skin as well. Indeed, AEA, 2-AG, CB1 and CB2 together with the major eCB-metabolizing enzymes (e.g. fatty acid amide hydrolase [FAAH], which cleaves AEA to ethanolamine and pro-inflammatory arachidonic acid) were found in various cutaneous cell types. Importantly, the eCB-tone and cannabinoid signaling in general appear to play a key role in regulating several fundamental aspects of cutaneous homeostasis, including proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes, hair growth, sebaceous lipid production, melanogenesis, fibroblast activity, etc.

Moreover, appropriate eCB-signaling through CB1 and CB2 receptors was found to be crucially important in keeping cutaneous inflammatory processes under control.

Collectively, these findings (together with many other recently published data) implied keratinocytes to be “non-classical” immune competent cells, playing a central role in initiation and regulation of cutaneous immune processes, and the “c(ut)annabinoid” system is now proven to be one of their master regulators.

Another recently emerging, fascinating possibility to manage cutaneous inflammation through the cannabinoid signaling is the administration of phytocannabinoids (pCB). Cannabis sativa contains over 100 different pCBs, the vast majority of which have no psychotropic activity, and usually possess a “favorable” side-effect profile, which makes these substances particularly interesting drug candidates in treating several inflammation-accompanied diseases.

With respect to the skin, we have recently shown that one of the best studied pCBs, (−)-cannabidiol (CBD), may have great potential in managing acne, an inflammation-accompanied, extremely prevalent cutaneous disease.

Collectively, in light of the above results, both increase/restoration of the homeostatic cutaneous eCB-tone by FAAH-inhibitors and topical administration of non-psychotropic pCBs hold out the promise to exert remarkable anti-inflammatory actions, making them very exciting drug candidates, deserving full clinical exploration as potent, yet safe novel class of anti-inflammatory agents.”

http://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(17)30003-8/fulltext

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Palmitoylethanolamide reduces inflammation and itch in a mouse model of contact allergic dermatitis.

Image result for Eur J Pharmacol.

“In mice, 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) induces contact allergic dermatitis (CAD), which, in a late phase, is characterized by mast cell (MC) infiltration and angiogenesis.

Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), an endogenous anti-inflammatory molecule, acts by down-modulating MCs following activation of the cannabinoid CB2 receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α).

We have previously reported the anti-inflammatory effect of PEA in the early stage of CAD.

Here, we examined whether PEA reduces the features of the late stage of CAD including MC activation, angiogenesis and itching.

PEA, by reducing the features of late stage CAD in mice, may be beneficial in this pathological condition.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27720681

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Oleoylethanolamine and palmitoylethanolamine modulate intestinal permeability in vitro via TRPV1 and PPARα.

Image result for FASEB J.

“Cannabinoids modulate intestinal permeability through CB1.

The endocannabinoid-like compounds oleoylethanolamine (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) play an important role in digestive regulation, and we hypothesized they would also modulate intestinal permeability.

OEA and PEA have endogenous roles and potential therapeutic applications in conditions of intestinal hyperpermeability and inflammation.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27623929

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Selective Cannabinoid Receptor-1 Agonists Regulate Mast Cell Activation in an Oxazolone-Induced Atopic Dermatitis Model.

“Many inflammatory mediators, including various cytokines (e.g. interleukins and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]), inflammatory proteases, and histamine are released following mast cell activation.

Endogenous cannabinoids such as palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide or AEA), were found in peripheral tissues and have been proposed to possess autacoid activity, implying that cannabinoids may downregulate mast cell activation and local inflammation.

Our results indicate that CB1R agonists down-regulate mast cell activation and may be used for relieving inflammatory symptoms mediated by mast cell activation, such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and contact dermatitis.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26848215

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Role of Endocannabinoid Activation of Peripheral CB1 Receptors in the Regulation of Autoimmune Disease.

“The impact of the endogenous cannabinoids (AEA, 2-AG, PEA, and virodamine) on the immune cell expressed cannabinoid receptors (CB1, CB2, TRPV-1, and GPR55) and consequent regulation of immune function is an exciting area of research with potential implications in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

Despite significant advances in understanding the mechanisms through which cannabinoids regulate immune functions, not much is known about the role of endocannabinoids in the pathogenesis or prevention of autoimmune diseases.

Inasmuch as CB2 expression on immune cells and its role has been widely reported, the importance of CB1 in immunological disorders has often been overlooked especially because it is not highly expressed on naive immune cells.

Therefore, the current review aims at delineating the effect of endocannabinoids on CB1 receptors in T cell driven autoimmune diseases. This review will also highlight some autoimmune diseases in which there is evidence indicating a role for endocannabinoids in the regulation of autoimmune pathogenesis.

Overall, based on the evidence presented using the endocannabinoids, specifically AEA, we propose that the peripheral CB1 receptor is involved in the regulation and amelioration of inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24911431

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous