Mechanisms of action of cannabidiol in adoptively transferred experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

Cover image

“Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the most important compounds in Cannabis sativa, lacks psychotropic effects, and possesses a high number of therapeutic properties including the amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

The aim of this study was to analyse the relative efficacy of CBD in adoptively transferred EAE (at-EAE), a model that allows better delineation of the effector phase of EAE.

Preventive intraperitoneal treatment with CBD ameliorated the clinical signs of at-EAE. CBD markedly improved the clinical signs of at-EAE and reduced infiltration, demyelination and axonal damage. The CBD-mediated decrease in the viability of encephalitogenic cells involves ROS generation, apoptosis and a decrease in IL-6 production and may contribute to the therapeutic effect of this compound.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28867485

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014488617302212

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Explorative Placebo-Controlled Double-Blind Intervention Study with Low Doses of Inhaled Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol Reveals No Effect on Sweet Taste Intensity Perception and Liking in Humans.

“Introduction: The endocannabinoid system (ECS) plays an important role in food reward. For example, in humans, liking of palatable foods is assumed to be modulated by endocannabinoid activity. Studies in rodents suggest that the ECS also plays a role in sweet taste intensity perception, but it is unknown to what extent this can be extrapolated to humans. Therefore, this study aimed at elucidating whether Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or cannabidiol (CBD) affects sweet taste intensity perception and liking in humans, potentially resulting in alterations in food preferences.

Results: Inhalation of the Cannabis preparations did not affect sweet taste intensity perception and liking, ranking order, or ad libitum consumption of the favorite drink. In addition, food preferences were not influenced by the interventions. Reported fullness was lower, whereas desire to eat was higher throughout the THC compared to the CBD condition.

Conclusions: These results suggest that administration of Cannabis preparations at the low doses tested does not affect sweet taste intensity perception and liking, nor does it influence food preferences in humans.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28861511

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/can.2017.0018

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Decarboxylation Study of Acidic Cannabinoids: A Novel Approach Using Ultra-High-Performance Supercritical Fluid Chromatography/Photodiode Array-Mass Spectrometry.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. publishers

“Decarboxylation is an important step for efficient production of the major active components in cannabis, for example, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and cannabigerol (CBG). These cannabinoids do not occur in significant concentrations in cannabis but can be formed by decarboxylation of their corresponding acids, the predominant cannabinoids in the plant. Study of the kinetics of decarboxylation is of importance for phytocannabinoid isolation and dosage formulation for medical use. Efficient analytical methods are essential for simultaneous detection of both neutral and acidic cannabinoidsMethods:C. sativaextracts were used for the studies. Decarboxylation conditions were examined at 80°C, 95°C, 110°C, 130°C, and 145°C for different times up to 60 min in a vacuum oven. An ultra-high performance supercritical fluid chromatography/photodiode array-mass spectrometry (UHPSFC/PDA-MS) method was used for the analysis of acidic and neutral cannabinoids before and after decarboxylation. Results: Decarboxylation at different temperatures displayed an exponential relationship between concentration and time indicating a first-order or pseudo-first-order reaction. The rate constants for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid-A (THCA-A) were twice those of the cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) and cannabigerolic acid (CBGA). Decarboxylation of THCA-A was forthright with no side reactions or by-products. Decarboxylation of CBDA and CBGA was not as straightforward due to the unexplained loss of reactants or products. Conclusion: The reported UHPSFC/PDA-MS method provided consistent and sensitive analysis of phytocannabinoids and their decarboxylation products and degradants. The rate of change of acidic cannabinoid concentrations over time allowed for determination of rate constants. Variations of rate constants with temperature yielded values for reaction energy.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28861498

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/can.2016.0020

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

An Update on Safety and Side Effects of Cannabidiol: A Review of Clinical Data and Relevant Animal Studies.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. publishers

“This literature survey aims to extend the comprehensive survey performed by Bergamaschi et al. in 2011 on cannabidiol (CBD) safety and side effects. Apart from updating the literature, this article focuses on clinical studies and CBD potential interactions with other drugs.

Results: In general, the often described favorable safety profile of CBD in humans was confirmed and extended by the reviewed research. The majority of studies were performed for treatment of epilepsy and psychotic disorders. Here, the most commonly reported side effects were tiredness, diarrhea, and changes of appetite/weight. In comparison with other drugs, used for the treatment of these medical conditions, CBD has a better side effect profile. This could improve patients’ compliance and adherence to treatment. CBD is often used as adjunct therapy. Therefore, more clinical research is warranted on CBD action on hepatic enzymes, drug transporters, and interactions with other drugs and to see if this mainly leads to positive or negative effects, for example, reducing the needed clobazam doses in epilepsy and therefore clobazam’s side effects.

Conclusion: This review also illustrates that some important toxicological parameters are yet to be studied, for example, if CBD has an effect on hormones. Additionally, more clinical trials with a greater number of participants and longer chronic CBD administration are still lacking.”

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Even High Doses of Oral Cannabidol Do Not Cause THC-Like Effects in Humans

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. publishers

“Cannabidiol (CBD) is a cannabinoid of the cannabis plant devoid of intoxicating effects. It may be of therapeutic value in a large number of diseases, including epilepsy, anxiety disorders, depression, schizophrenic psychosis, inflammatory diseases, dystonia, nausea, and vomiting without causing relevant or severe side effects.

No biosynthetic enzyme or pathway exists in the human body to convert CBD to THC.

This short communication examines the question whether the experimental data presented in a study by Merrick et al. are of clinical relevance. These authors found that cannabidiol (CBD), a major cannabinoid of the cannabis plant devoid of psychotropic effects and of great interest for therapeutic use in several medical conditions, may be converted in gastric fluid into the psychoactive cannabinoids delta-8-THC and delta-9-THC to a relevant degree. They concluded that “the acidic environment during normal gastrointestinal transit can expose orally CBD-treated patients to levels of THC and other psychoactive cannabinoids that may exceed the threshold for a positive physiological response.” They issued a warning concerning oral use of CBD and recommend the development of other delivery methods.

However, the available clinical data do not support this conclusion and recommendation, since even high doses of oral CBD do not cause psychological, psychomotor, cognitive, or physical effects that are characteristic for THC or cannabis rich in THC. On the contrary, in the past decades and by several groups, high doses of oral CBD were consistently shown to cause opposite effects to those of THC in clinical studies. In addition, administration of CBD did not result in detectable THC blood concentrations.

Thus, there is no reason to avoid oral use of CBD, which has been demonstrated to be a safe means of administration of CBD, even at very high doses.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28861499

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/can.2016.0036

“A Conversion of Oral Cannabidiol to Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Seems Not to Occur in Humans.”  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28861507

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

The potential role of cannabinoids in epilepsy treatment.

Publication Cover

“Epilepsy is one of the world’s oldest recognized and prevalent neurological diseases. It has a great negative impact on patients’ quality of life (QOL) as a consequence of treatment resistant seizures in about 30% of patients together with drugs’ side effects and comorbidities. Therefore, new drugs are needed and cannabinoids, above all cannabidiol, have recently gathered attention.

This review summarizes the scientific data from human and animal studies on the major cannabinoids which have been of interest in the treatment of epilepsy, including drugs acting on the endocannabinoid system.

Despite the fact that cannabis has been used for many purposes over 4 millennia, the development of drugs based on cannabinoids has been very slow. Only recently, research has focused on their potential effects and CBD is the first treatment of this group with clinical evidence of efficacy in children with Dravet syndrome; moreover, other studies are currently ongoing to confirm its effectiveness in patients with epilepsy.

On the other hand, it will be of interest to understand whether drugs acting on the endocannabinoid system will be able to reach the market and prove their known preclinical efficacy also in patients with epilepsy.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28845714   http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14737175.2017.1373019

 

“The role of cannabinoids and endocannabinoid system in the treatment of epilepsy. Cannabis has been used for thousands of years in the treatment of various diseases. Cannabinoids have been shown in preliminary animal model studies and in studies of patients with epilepsy to have antiepileptic activity. ” https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/joepi.ahead-of-print/joepi-2015-0034/joepi-2015-0034.xml
“Phytocannabinoids produce anticonvulsant effects through the endocannabinoid system, with few adverse effects.”
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Cannabis Pharmacology: The Usual Suspects and a Few Promising Leads.

Advances in Pharmacology

“The golden age of cannabis pharmacology began in the 1960s as Raphael Mechoulam and his colleagues in Israel isolated and synthesized cannabidiol, tetrahydrocannabinol, and other phytocannabinoids. Initially, THC garnered most research interest with sporadic attention to cannabidiol, which has only rekindled in the last 15 years through a demonstration of its remarkably versatile pharmacology and synergy with THC. Gradually a cognizance of the potential of other phytocannabinoids has developed. Contemporaneous assessment of cannabis pharmacology must be even far more inclusive. Medical and recreational consumers alike have long believed in unique attributes of certain cannabis chemovars despite their similarity in cannabinoid profiles. This has focused additional research on the pharmacological contributions of mono- and sesquiterpenoids to the effects of cannabis flower preparations. Investigation reveals these aromatic compounds to contribute modulatory and therapeutic roles in the cannabis entourage far beyond expectations considering their modest concentrations in the plant. Synergistic relationships of the terpenoids to cannabinoids will be highlighted and include many complementary roles to boost therapeutic efficacy in treatment of pain, psychiatric disorders, cancer, and numerous other areas. Additional parts of the cannabis plant provide a wide and distinct variety of other compounds of pharmacological interest, including the triterpenoid friedelin from the roots, canniprene from the fan leaves, cannabisin from seed coats, and cannflavin A from seed sprouts. This chapter will explore the unique attributes of these agents and demonstrate how cannabis may yet fulfil its potential as Mechoulam’s professed “pharmacological treasure trove.””

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28826544

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054358917300273?via%3Dihub

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

Anticonvulsant effect of cannabidiol in the pentylenetetrazole model: Pharmacological mechanisms, electroencephalographic profile, and brain cytokine levels.

“Cannabidiol (CBD), the main nonpsychotomimetic compound from Cannabis sativa, inhibits experimental seizures in animal models and alleviates certain types of intractable epilepsies in patients.

Here we tested the hypothesis that CBD anticonvulsant mechanisms are prevented by cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) and vanilloid (TRPV1) receptor blockers. We also investigated its effects on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity and hippocampal cytokines in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) model.

Pretreatment with CBD (60mg/kg) attenuated seizures induced by intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, and intravenous PTZ administration in mice. The effects were reversed by CB1, CB2, and TRPV1 selective antagonists (AM251, AM630, and SB366791, respectively). Additionally, CBD delayed seizure sensitization resulting from repeated PTZ administration (kindling). This cannabinoid also prevented PTZ-induced EEG activity and interleukin-6 increase in prefrontal cortex.

In conclusion, the robust anticonvulsant effects of CBD may result from multiple pharmacological mechanisms, including facilitation of endocannabinoid signaling and TRPV1 mechanisms. These findings advance our understanding on CBD inhibition of seizures, EEG activity, and cytokine actions, with potential implications for the development of new treatments for certain epileptic syndromes.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28821005

http://www.epilepsybehavior.com/article/S1525-5050(17)30322-0/fulltext

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

The orphan receptor GPR55 is a novel cannabinoid receptor

Logo of brjpharm

“Preparations of Cannabis sativa have been used for medicinal and recreational purposes for at least 4000 years and extracts of C. sativa contain over 60 different pharmacologically active components the most prominent being Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and cannabidiol

Ligands such as cannabidiol and abnormal cannabidiol which exhibit no CB1or CB2 activity and are believed to function at a novel cannabinoid receptor, also showed activity at GPR55.

These data suggest that GPR55 is a novel cannabinoid receptor, and its ligand profile with respect to CB1and CB2 described here will permit delineation of its physiological function(s).”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2095107/

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous

GPR55: A therapeutic target for Parkinson’s disease?

Cover image

“The GPR55 receptor is expressed abundantly in the brain, especially in the striatum, suggesting it might fulfill a role in motor function. Indeed, motor behavior is impaired in mice lacking GPR55, which also display dampened inflammatory responses.

Abnormal-cannabidiol (Abn-CBD), a synthetic cannabidiol (CBD) isomer, is a GPR55 agonist that may serve as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

In this study, we explored whether modulating GPR55 could also represent a therapeutic approach for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD).

These results demonstrate for the first time that activation of GPR55 might be beneficial in combating PD.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28807673

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0028390817303842

“The orphan receptor GPR55 is a novel cannabinoid receptor”  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2095107/

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous