Antihyperalgesic Activities of Endocannabinoids in a Mouse Model of Antiretroviral-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

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“Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are the cornerstone of the antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). However, their use is sometimes limited by the development of a painful sensory neuropathy, which does not respond well to drugs.

Smoked cannabis has been reported in clinical trials to have efficacy in relieving painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy.

The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the expression of endocannabinoid system molecules is altered during NRTI-induced painful neuropathy, and also whether endocannabinoids can attenuate NRTI-induced painful neuropathy.

Conclusion: These data show that ddC induces thermal hyperalgesia, which is associated with dysregulation of the mRNA expression of some endocannabinoid system molecules. The endocannabinoids AEA and 2-AG have antihyperalgesic activity, which is dependent on cannabinoid receptor and GPR55 activation. Thus, agonists of cannabinoid receptors and GPR55 could be useful therapeutic agents for the management of NRTI-induced painful sensory neuropathy.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28373843

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Antihyperalgesic effect of CB1 receptor activation involves the modulation of P2X3 receptor in the primary afferent neuron.

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“Cannabinoid system is a potential target for pain control.

Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) activation play a role in the analgesic effect of cannabinoids once it is expressed in primary afferent neurons.

This study investigates whether the anti-hyperalgesic effect of CB1receptor activation involves P2×3 receptor in primary afferent neurons.

Our data suggest that the analgesic effect of CB1 receptor activation is mediated by a negative modulation of the P2×3 receptor in the primary afferent neurons.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28131783

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Antihyperalgesic effect of a Cannabis sativa extract in a rat model of neuropathic pain: mechanisms involved.

Abstract

“This study aimed to give a rationale for the employment of phytocannabinoid formulations to treat neuropathic pain. It was found that a controlled cannabis extract, containing multiple cannabinoids, in a defined ratio, and other non-cannabinoid fractions (terpenes and flavonoids) provided better antinociceptive efficacy than the single cannabinoid given alone, when tested in a rat model of neuropathic pain. The results also demonstrated that such an antihyperalgesic effect did not involve the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, whereas it was mediated by vanilloid receptors TRPV1. The non-psychoactive compound, cannabidiol, is the only component present at a high level in the extract able to bind to this receptor: thus cannabidiol was the drug responsible for the antinociceptive behaviour observed. In addition, the results showed that after chronic oral treatment with cannabis extract the hepatic total content of cytochrome P450 was strongly inhibited as well as the intestinal P-glycoprotein activity. It is suggested that the inhibition of hepatic metabolism determined an increased bioavailability of cannabidiol resulting in a greater effect. However, in the light of the well known antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties of terpenes and flavonoids which could significantly contribute to the therapeutic effects, it cannot be excluded that the synergism observed might be achieved also in the absence of the cytochrome P450 inhibition.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18618522

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Spinal and peripheral analgesic effects of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist AM1241 in two models of bone cancer-induced pain

“…a great body of evidence demonstrates the analgesic efficacy of systemically administered CB2 agonists in acute and chronic experimental pain….

The activation of CB2 receptors induces analgesia in experimental models of chronic pain. The present experiments were designed to study whether the activation of peripheral or spinal CB2 receptors relieves thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in two models of bone cancer pain.

Conclusions and implications:

Spinal CB2 receptors are involved in the antiallodynic effect… in two neoplastic models while peripheral and spinal receptors participate in the antihyperalgesic effects… The use of drugs that activate CB2 receptors could be a useful strategy to counteract bone cancer-induced pain symptoms.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2931557/

 

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A cannabinoid 2 receptor agonist attenuates bone cancer-induced pain and bone loss

“CB2 agonists not only produce antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects, but also have been shown to increase bone density.”

“Recent reports suggest that sustained opiates can produce paradoxical hyperalgesic actions and enhance bone destruction in a murine model of bone cancer. In contrast, CB(2) selective agonists have been shown to reduce bone loss associated with a model of osteoporosis. Here we tested whether a CB(2) agonist administered over a 7day period inhibits bone cancer-induced pain as well as attenuates cancer-induced bone degradation.”

“Based on the antihyperalgesic effects of CB2 agonists, the lack of potential CNS-induced side effects and their propensity to stimulated bone growth, we addressed whether the sustained selective CB2 agonists…  has the potential to alleviate bone cancer-induced pain while maintaining bone integrity in a murine model of bone cancer”.

“These findings suggest a novel therapy for cancer-induced bone pain, bone loss and bone fracture while lacking many unwanted side effects seen with current treatments for bone cancer pain.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871326/

 

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Activation of peripheral cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors suppresses the maintenance of inflammatory nociception: a comparative analysis.

“Background and Purpose:

Effects of locally administered agonists and antagonists for cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors on mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity were compared after the establishment of chronic inflammation.

Conclusions and Implications:

Cannabinoids act locally through distinct CB1 and CB2 mechanisms to suppress mechanical hypersensitivity after the establishment of chronic inflammation, at doses that produced modest changes in thermal hyperalgesia. Additive antihyperalgesic effects were observed following prophylactic co-administration of the CB1– and CB2-selective agonists. Our results suggest that peripheral cannabinoid antihyperalgesic actions may be exploited for treatment of inflammatory pain states.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2042894/

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Activation of peripheral cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors suppresses the maintenance of inflammatory nociception: a comparative analysis

“Effects of locally administered agonists and antagonists for cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors on mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity were compared after the establishment of chronic inflammation.”

“Cannabinoids act locally through distinct CB1 and CB2 mechanisms to suppress mechanical hypersensitivity after the establishment of chronic inflammation, at doses that produced modest changes in thermal hyperalgesia. Additive antihyperalgesic effects were observed following prophylactic co-administration of the CB1– and CB2-selective agonists. Our results suggest that peripheral cannabinoid antihyperalgesic actions may be exploited for treatment of inflammatory pain states.”

“In summary, our results demonstrate that selective activation of CB1 or CB2 receptors in the inflamed paw is sufficient to suppress tactile allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia. This suppression is observed under conditions in which only a partial suppression of thermal hyperalgesia was observed. Collectively, our data suggest that peripheral cannabinoid analgesic mechanisms may be exploited to suppress the tactile hypersensitivity observed in chronic inflammatory pain states.”

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2042894/

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